Mentoring Best Practices Resources

This page contains resources for mentoring best practices, which are based on the Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™, Fourth Edition, published by the MENTOR: The National Mentoring Partnership (MENTOR). The resources are indexed by sections of the National Quality Mentoring System (NQMS) tool so that NQMS participants can easily access relevant resources. Special thanks to MENTOR Minnesota for helping develop and update this list.

Program Management and Administration:

A. Design a Mentoring Program
B. Establish leadership structure for program (i.e., board of directors or advisory group)
C. Staff your program
D. Create a professional development plan for staff
E. Develop a financial management and resource development plan
F. Develop systems for managing program information and data
G. Establish a marketing/public relations effort
H. Participate in mentoring advocacy efforts 

Program Operations:

I. Develop plan for recruiting mentors
J. Develop plan for recruiting mentees
K. Screen potential mentors
L. Screen potential mentees
M. Prepare mentors for match
N. Prepare mentees and/or families for match
O. Match mentors and mentees
P. Provide ongoing support and recognition
Q. Supervise and monitor mentoring relationships
R. Help mentors and mentees reach closure

Program Operations:

S. Determine what elements of program progress to measure
T. Determine how the program will measure progress and collect data
U. Analyze evaluation data and use results to enhance program


Program Management and Administration

A. Design mentoring program

A1. Determine mission of mentoring program and write mission program.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 54

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence (HFI)
p. 8, 10-11

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 10-11

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: A Guidebook to Program Development
Michael Garringer, Mark Fulop and Vikki Rennick National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP)
p. 3-4 – develop written mission and vision

Building Blocks of Quality Mentoring Programs
Mentoring Canada
Big Brothers Big Sisters of Canada
Mentoring Groundwork
Infrastructure
Program Components
Outcomes

School-Based Mentoring
Dr. Jean Rhodes Research Corner Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.

Building Effective Peer Mentoring Programs in Schools: An Introductory Guide
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS), Northwest Regional and Education Laboratory (NWREL) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 1-4 – introduction
p. 5-9 – hallmark program design components of quality cross-age peer-mentoring programs
p. 11-14 – recruiting young people to be mentors
p. 14-15 – recruiting mentees
p. 15-16 – screening peer mentors
p. 17-27 – training peer mentors
p. 29-37 – tips on activities and activity resources
p. 39 – conclusion

The Mosaic of Faith-Based Mentoring
The National Mentoring Center Bulletin Issue 12 (2003) Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL)
p. 1-2 – The Mosaic of Faith-Based Mentoring M. Fulop
p. 3-4; 13-14 – Making a Difference in the Spirit of Kinship M. Garringer
p. 5-6 – State Partnerships Reach Out to Faith Programs
p. 7-12 – The Work of a Saint M. Garringer
p. 15-16; 19 – A Faith-Based Initiative Continues To Grow
p. 17 – A Church/BBBS Partnership Finds Success Where It Counts: With Kids
p. 18-19 – resources

Online Mentoring
Dr. Jean Rhodes Research Corner Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring. Work-Based Mentoring Dr. Jean Rhodes Research Corner Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.

Group Mentoring
Dr. Jean Rhodes Research Corner Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.

Designing and Implementing a Group Mentoring Program
Mentoring Tactics 1:4 Jerry Sherk (2006) Center for Applied Research Solutions (CARS)
p. 1-2 – possible advantages and disadvantages of group mentoring
p. 2 – group mentoring models
p. 2-3 – needs assessment
p. 3-4 – program design process
p. 4-6 – curriculum
p. 6-9 – recruitment to monitoring
p. 10-11 – evaluation and summary
p. 12 – resources

Mentoring Models for Youth With Disabilities: Miami "Shake a Leg" Program
Kerrilyn Scott-Nakai Mentoring Fact Sheet Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 1-2 – research on mentoring and youth with disabilities
p. 3-6 – best practices and strategies

Strengthening Mentoring Opportunities for At-Risk Youth
Policy Brief Timothy Cavell, David DuBois, Michael Karcher, Thomas Keller, and Jean Rhodes

Contemporary Issues in Mentoring
Amy J.A. Arbreton, Douglas L. Fountain, Diane Colasanto, Jean Baldwin Grossman, Natalie Jaffe, Amy Johnson, Kathryn Taaffe McLearn, Catherine Schoen, Michele Yellowitz Shapiro, and Cynthia L. Sipe Public/Private Ventures (P/PV)

A2. Define goals and objectives for mentoring program.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 54

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 8-9; 16

The ABCs of School-Based Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Jucovy and Michael Garringer NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 13-16 – developing goals, objectives, importance of multi-year model
p. 19-20 – how will you evaluate the program? Outcomes, roles

Yes You Can: A Guide for Establishing Mentoring Programs to Prepare Youth for College
Andrew Lauland US Department of Education
p. 20-21 – developing goals and objectives with example

A3. Establish written policies and procedures manual for mentoring program management, operations and evaluation.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section IV (I-IV)
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 22; 48

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence (HFI)
p. 63-64

How to Develop an Operations Manual for Your Mentoring Program
Jerry Sherk The EMT Group, Inc. Based on the 10 recommended best practices for mentor programs (QAS) for youth mentoring programs and what to include in the development manual
p. 1-2 – development of operations manual and brief descriptions of 10 best practices
p. 3 – statement of purpose and long-range plan
p. 4 – recruitment
p. 5 – orientation
p. 6 – screening
p. 7 – training curriculum
p. 8 – matching strategy
p. 9 – monitoring process
p. 10 – support, recognition and retention
p. 11 – closure
p. 12 – evaluation

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer NMC: NWREL and HFI
p.1 – importance of a policy and procedure manual
p. 2-3 – defining policies and procedures

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual Customizable Template Version
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer NMC: NWREL and HFI (Word, 1.14 MB)

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: A Guidebook to Program Development
Michael Garringer, Mark Fulop and Vikki Rennick National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP)
p. 9-10 – policy and procedural development

Best Practices for Mentoring Programs
Jerry Sherk The Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Group, Inc.

The Essence of Youth Protection: Rules, Reporting and Consequences
Nonprofit Risk Management Center

Going the Distance: A Guide to Building Lasting Relationships in Mentoring Programs
Dr. Susan Weinberger, Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS), Northwest Regional and Education Laboratory (NWREL) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 11 – program policies and procedures
p. 13 – youth and criteria
p. 25-28 – matching criteria, policies and procedures
p. 31-33 – monitoring; check in with mentors and mentees and their families
p. 49 – conclusion
p. 50 – references
Appendix A: A1-A25 – sample forms

A4. Document a system for managing program risk (risks to program mission, property and participants).

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 55-57

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 1-4; 5 – importance of policy and procedure manual; examples

Mentoring Essentials: Risk Management for Mentoring Programs
Dustianne North and Jerry Sherk The Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Group, Inc.
p. 1-2 to 1-5 – what is risk management
p. 2-2 to 2-6 – program risk self-assessment
Classification of Mentoring Relationship Types table (4 pages)
p. 2-12 to 2-23 – liability and insurance
p. 3-2 to 3-6 – scenario/activities for a team to practice
p. 4-2 to 4-4 – strategize to reduce risk worksheets: activities, collaborative relationships, settings
p. 4-8 to 4-9 – Quality Assurance Standards (QAS) Risk Matrix
A detailed example follows this two page description (no page numbers)
p. 5-2 to 5-4 – preparing participants for risk worksheets
p. 6-2 to 6-5 – ongoing training, monitoring and supervision, support and managing referral networks
p. 6-8 to 6-15; 7-2 to 7-3 – four troubleshooting and one crisis scenarios
p. 8-1 to 8-11 – preventing child sex abuse: general information, indicators of, screening tools for and prevention
p. 8-12 – Child Sexual Abuse Matrix – 3 pages (no page numbers)
p. OM-2 to OM-13 – developing an operations manual

Managing Risk After the Match Is Made Mentoring Fact Sheet
Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 1-2 – risk and prevention
p. 2-3 – screening and ongoing training
p. 3-4 – mentor behaviors that pose risk
p. 4 – tips for assessing risk
p. 5-6 – scenario planning
p. 6 – references, reading and resources

A5. Create a strategic plan for the mentoring program based on mission, goals and objectives for the program.

Preparation for Strategic Planning
Written by Carter McNamara, MBA, PhD, Authenticity Consulting, LLC, experts in strategic planning. Copyright 1997-2008.

Strategic Planning: The Basic Idea
idealist.org From the Support Center for Nonprofit Management in San Francisco. Copyright 199401995.

Chapter 8: Developing a Strategic Plan
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010). Chapter 8: Developing a Strategic Plan. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/chapter_1007.htm
Section 1. An Overview of Strategic Planning or "VMOSA" (Vision, Mission, Objectives, Strategies, and Action Plans)
Section 2. Proclaiming Your Dream: Developing Vision and Mission Statements
Section 3. Creating Objectives
Section 4. Developing Successful Strategies: Planning to Win
Section 5. Developing an Action Plan
Section 6. Obtaining Feedback from Constituents: What Changes are Important and Feasible?
Section 7. Identifying Action Steps in Bringing About Community and Systems Change

A6. Establish process to regularly review mentoring program policies and procedures.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 58

Yes You Can: A Guide for Establishing Mentoring Programs to Prepare Youth for College
Andrew Lauland U.S. Department of Education
p. 50-52 – Checklist for Mentoring Programs from the National Mentoring Partnership

Improving an Existing Mentoring Program
Dr. Linda Phillips-Jones © 2010 CCC/The Mentoring Group, http://www.mentoringgroup.com

Documents:
Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section I-IV, Tab A
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
Program Parameters
Program Implementation Timeline (Word, 52k)
12-Month Activity Calendar (Word, 23k)
Writing a Mission Statement (Word, 29k)
Establishing Goals and Objectives and Worksheet (Word, 25k)
Mentoring Program Outline and Worksheet (Word, 29k)
Program Outline (RBS/The First Tee-Example) Program Planning and Management (Word, 86k)
Program Planning and Management
Job Descriptions and Duties of Mentoring Program Staff (Word, 35k)
Program Coordinator Position Description (Word, 30k)
Workplace Mentoring Program Liaison (Community-based) (Word, 23k)
School Liaison Responsibilities (Word, 23k)
Policies and Procedures
Program Liability and Risk Management (Word, 45k)
E-mentoring
E-mentoring Program Fact Sheet (Digital Heroes Campaign) (Word, 3k)
E-mentoring Program Implementation Timeline (Word, 30k)
E-Mentoring Program Coordinator Roles and Responsibilities (Word, 30k)
Sign-Up Form for Mentors (Word, 24k)
Parent/Guardian Permission Form (Word, 26k)
Congratulations/Matched E-mail (Word, 23k)
E-mentee Profile Form (Word, 25k)
E-mentor Profile Form (Word, 24k)
Mentee Conversation Tip Sheet (Word, 24k)
Conversation Starters for Mentees (Word, 25k)
E-mentee Writing Lesson (Word, 23k)

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B. Establish leadership structure for program (i.e., board of directors or advisory group)

B1. Define the roles and responsibilities of those serving in a leadership capacity, including oversight, management and governance roles.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 53-54

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence (HFI)
p. 8

Guidelines to Form an Advisory Group
Written by Carter McNamara, MBA, PhD, Authenticity Consulting, LLC. Copyright 1997-2008. Free Management Library (FML)

Building an Effective Advisory Committee
Mentoring Fact Sheet Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 3 – recruiting
p. 6 – team building and structure development

Advisory Volunteers
Susan J. Ellis Originally published as the bi-monthly column "On Volunteers" in The NonProfit Times, © 1992. Found in the Energize website library at: http://www.energizeinc.com/art.html

Free Complete Toolkit for Boards
Written by Carter McNamara, MBA, PhD, Authenticity Consulting, LLC - experts in nonprofit Boards!
Copyright 1997-2008. FML

Sustainability Planning and Resource Development for Youth Mentoring Programs: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Craig Bowman, Miki Hodge, Renee Hoover, Patti MacRae, Phyllis McGrath, Beth Senger, Dennis Wakeland, and Dr. Susan G. Weinberger NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 93-109 – board responsibilities in resource development

Chapter 9: Developing an Organizational Structure for the Initiative
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010). Chapter 9: Developing an Organizational Structure for the Initiative. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/chapter_1008.htm
Section 1. Organizational Structure: An Overview
Section 2. Choosing a Group to Create and Run Your Initiative
Section 3. Developing Multisector Task Forces or Action Committees for the Initiative
Section 4. Developing an Ongoing Board of Directors
Section 5. Welcoming and Training New Members to a Board of Directors
Section 6. Maintaining a Board of Directors
Section 7. Writing Bylaws
Section 8. Including Youth on Your Board, Commission, or Committee Section 9. Understanding and Writing Contracts and Memoranda of Agreement

B2. Recruit individuals with backgrounds that reflect program participants, and who bring needed experience and resources to the organization to fill leadership roles.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 53-55

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 8

Building an Effective Advisory Committee
Mentoring Fact Sheet Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 2 – clarify purpose and scope
p. 3 – recruit those who fit with the group's purpose
p. 6 – possible application process with staff and board input
p. 7 – identify leads for each area of involvement

Chapter 27: Cultural Competence in a Multicultural World
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010). Chapter 27: Cultural Competence in a Multicultural World. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/chapter_1027.htm
Section 1. Understanding Culture and Diversity in Building Communities
Section 2. Building Relationships with People from Different Cultures
Section 3. Healing from the Effects of Internalized Oppression
Section 4. Strategies and Activities for Reducing Racial Prejudice and Racism
Section 5. Learning to be an Ally for People from Diverse Groups and Backgrounds
Section 6. Creating Opportunities for Members of Groups to Identify Their Similarities, Differences, and Assets
Section 7. Building Culturally Competent Organizations
Section 8. Multicultural Collaboration
Section 9. Transforming Conflicts in Diverse Communities
Section 10. Understanding Culture, Social Organization, and Leadership to Enhance Engagement
Section 11. Building Inclusive Communities

Advisory Volunteers
Susan J. Ellis Originally published as the bi-monthly column "On Volunteers" in The NonProfit Times, © 1992. Found in the Energize website library at: http://www.energizeinc.com/art.html

Free Complete Toolkit for Boards
Written by Carter McNamara, MBA, PhD, Authenticity Consulting, LLC - experts in nonprofit Boards! Copyright 1997-2008. FML

Chapter 15: Becoming an Effective Manager
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010). Chapter 15: Becoming an Effective Manager. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/chapter_1015.htm
Section 1. Developing a Management Plan
Section 2. Providing Supervision for Staff and Volunteers
Section 3. Providing Support for Staff and Volunteers
Section 4. Promoting Internal Communication
Section 5. Day-to-Day Maintenance of an Organization

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: A Guidebook to Program Development
Michael Garringer, Mark Fulop and Vikki Rennick National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP)
p. 13-14; 19-20

Sustainability Planning and Resource Development for Youth Mentoring Programs: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Craig Bowman, Miki Hodge, Renee Hoover, Patti MacRae, Phyllis McGrath, Beth Senger, Dennis Wakeland, and Dr. Susan G. Weinberger NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 93-109 – board responsibilities in resource development

B3. Define the structure of the leadership group, including frequency and purpose of the meetings.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 53-55

Guidelines to Form an Advisory Group
Written by Carter McNamara, MBA, PhD, Authenticity Consulting, LLC. Copyright 1997-2008. FML

Going the Distance: A Guide to Building Lasting Relationships in Mentoring Programs
Dr. Susan Weinberger, Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS), Northwest Regional and Education Laboratory (NWREL) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 8-9 – advisory council
Appendix A: A1-A25 – sample forms

Chapter 14: Core Functions in Leadership
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010). Chapter 14: Core Functions in Leadership. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/chapter_1014.htm
Section 1. Learning How to Be a Community Leader
Section 2. Developing and Communicating a Vision
Section 3. Discovering and Creating Possibilities
Section 4. Understanding People's Needs
Section 5. Building and Sustaining Commitment
Section 6. Influencing People
Section 7. Building and Sustaining Relationships
Section 8. Learning From and Contributing to Constituents
Section 9. Making Decisions
Section 10. Overcoming Setbacks and Adversity

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 12; 15 – organizational documents to include

B4. Facilitate & regularly convene leadership group meetings.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 55

Basic Guide to Conducting Effective Meetings
Written by Carter McNamara, MBA, PhD, Authenticity Consulting, LLC. Copyright 1997-2008. FML

Ways to Make Committee Work Effectively
Steve McCurley, VM Systems National CASA Association

Chapter 13: Orienting Ideas in Leadership
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010).
Chapter 13: Orienting Ideas in Leadership . Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/chapter_1013.htm
Section 1. Developing a Plan for Building Leadership
Section 2. Servant Leadership: Accepting and Maintaining the Call of Service
Section 3. Styles of Leadership
Section 4. Building Teams: Broadening the Base for Leadership
Section 5. Developing a Community Leadership Corps: A Model for Service-Learning
Section 6. Recognizing the Challenges of Leadership
Section 7. Encouraging Leadership Development Across the Life Span
Section 8. Ethical Leadership
Section 9. Choosing a Consultant (no link)
Section 10. Promoting Organizational Change and Development (no link)
Section 11. Collaborative Leadership
Section 12. Leading Collaboratively: Leadership As a Collaborative Enterprise (no link)

Chapter 16: Group Facilitation and Problem-Solving
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010).
Chapter 16: Group Facilitation and Problem-Solving . Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/chapter_1016.htm
Section 1. Conducting Effective Meetings
Section 2. Developing Facilitation Skills
Section 3. Capturing What People Say: Tips for Recording a Meeting
Section 4. Techniques For Leading Group Discussions

Documents:
Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V, Tab B
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
Advisory Group
Member, Board of Directors Job Description (Word, 24k)
Board of Directors Roles and Responsibilities (Word, 39k)
Responsibilities of Board Officers Program Information Management (Word, 25k)

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C. Staff your program

C1. Processes in place to support, retain and recognize mentoring program staff.

Program Staff in Youth Mentoring Programs: Qualifications, Training and Retention
Thomas E. Keller Research in Action Issue 3 Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 7-8; 15

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: A Guidebook to Program Development
Michael Garringer, Mark Fulop and Vikki Rennick National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP)
p. 15-17 – hiring and supporting staff

Recognition and Reward for Youth Development Workers
E-Newsletter National Youth Development Learning Network
p. 1-4

C2. Select staff responsible for overseeing the mentoring program with appropriate skills and experience to lead and manage the program.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section IV (I-IV)
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p.21-22

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 59

Leadership and Management Skills
Written by Carter McNamara, MBA, PhD, Authenticity Consulting, LLC. Copyright 1997-2008. Free Management Library (FML)

Hiring (Advertising, Screening, Selecting)
Written by Carter McNamara, MBA, PhD, Authenticity Consulting, LLC.
Copyright 1997-2008. FML
Point 5; 6

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence (HFI)
p. 72-73

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 13-14 – Program Coordinator Mentoring job description example

C3. Ensure other program staff (un/paid), including consultants or contractors have appropriate skills and experience for their work.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section IV (I-IV)
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 21-22

Program Staff in Youth Mentoring Programs: Qualifications, Training and Retention
Thomas E. Keller Research in Action Issue 3 Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 3-5

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: A Guidebook to Program Development
Michael Garringer, Mark Fulop and Vikki Rennick National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP)
p. 15-17 – qualified staff

Defining a Job Role
(Writing job descriptions) Written by Carter McNamara, MBA, PhD, Authenticity Consulting, LLC. Copyright 1997-2008. FML

Hiring Consultants…
Written by Carter McNamara, MBA, PhD, Authenticity Consulting, LLC. Copyright 1997-2009. FML

C4. Create and maintain a staffing structure that’s appropriate for the mentoring program model.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section IV (I-IV)
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 21-22

Organizing Staff
Entered by Carter McNamara, MBA, PhD, Authenticity Consulting, LLC. Copyright 1997-2009. FML

Proactively Supporting Staff: Strategies for Reducing Staff Turnover
Mentoring Fact Sheet Jerry Sherk Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 3-6

The ABCs of School-Based Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Jucovy and Michael Garringer NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 18-23 – school roles and responsibilities

Sustainability Planning and Resource Development for Youth Mentoring Programs: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Craig Bowman, Miki Hodge, Renee Hoover, Patti MacRae, Phyllis McGrath, Beth Senger, Dennis Wakeland, and Dr. Susan G. Weinberger NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 12-15; 20

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 16; 19

C5. Establish personnel policies and procedures.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section IV (I-IV)
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 22

Developing Personnel Policies
Written by Carter McNamara, MBA, PhD, Authenticity Consulting, LLC. Copyright 1997-2008. FML

Sample List of Personnel Policies
Written by Carter McNamara, MBA, PhD, Authenticity Consulting, LLC. Copyright 1997-2008. FML

Basics of Conflict Management
Written by Carter McNamara, MBA, PhD, Authenticity Consulting, LLC. Copyright 1997-2008 FML

Documents:
Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section I-IV, Tab A
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
Job Descriptions and Duties of Mentoring Program Staff (Word, 40k)

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D. Create a professional development plan for staff

D1. Provide orientation and initial training for all new program support staff (paid/volunteer).

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence (HFI)
p. 73
p. 93 – checklist of program components

Training New Mentors: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Amy Cannata, Michael Garringer, Christian Rummell, Elsy Arévalo, and Linda Jucovy NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 1-2 – goals of pre-service training
p. 3-7 – tips for trainers
p. 9-12 – developing agendas and scripts
p. 13-14 – working with specialists and trainers outside the program
p. 15-33 – sample mentor training, part 1: overview of the program with introduction to mentoring - includes ice breaker, mentor roles, program overview, the youth the program serves, youth’s needs and developmental assets and closing
p. 35-64 – sample mentor training, part 2: training mentors to work successfully with mentee - includes icebreaker, active listening, role playing communication skills, building relationships, mentor-mentee relationship cycle, boundaries and activities
p. 55-56 – reading and resources for training mentors

D2. Ensure program staff (paid/ volunteer) has opportunities to participate in internal and external networking activities.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 59

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 73

D3. Provide ongoing staff training for mentoring program staff through conferences and/or online coursework; and access to professional journals and articles.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 59

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 72-73

Program Staff in Youth Mentoring Programs: Qualifications, Training and Retention
Thomas E. Keller MENTOR Research in Action Issue 3 Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 14

D4. Develop & implement system to regularly review staff members’ performance, progress and development needs, as well as compensation.

Program Staff in Youth Mentoring Programs: Qualifications, Training and Retention
Thomas E. Keller MENTOR Research in Action Issue 3 Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 16

Recognition and Reward for Youth Development Workers
E-Newsletter National Youth Development Learning Network
p. 4

Documents:
Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
Professional Staff Development
Training Topics for Staff Outline Advocacy (Word, 27k)

Back to Top

E. Develop a financial management and resource development plan

E1. Develop a program budget that includes funds for program staff compensation, staff professional development, program expenses and activities and all other operations costs.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring. 
p. 55

Recognition and Reward for Youth Development Workers
E-Newsletter National Youth Development Learning Network
p. 3

Managing Program Finances
Written by Carter McNamara, MBA, PhD, Authenticity Consulting, LLC. Copyright 1997-2008. Free Management Library (FML)

The Nonprofit Budgeting Process

Nonprofits Assistance Fund (NAF)

Chapter 43: Managing finances
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010). Chapter 43: Managing Finances. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/chapter_1043.htm
Section 1. Planning and Writing an Annual Budget
Section 2. Managing Your Money
Section 3. Handling Accounting
Section 4. Understanding Nonprofit Status and Tax Exemption
Section 5. Creating a Financial and Audit Committee

E2. Establish a system for managing program finances and cash flow.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring. 
p. 55

Managing Operating Budgets and Cash Flow
Written by Carter McNamara, MBA, PhD, Authenticity Consulting, LLC. Copyright 1997-2008. FML

Managing Cash Flow Nonprofits Assistance Fund (NAF)
p.1 – why, when and how to manage cash flow
p.2 – management strategies and how to avoid problems

E3. Research and understand the program’s requirements for auditing.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring. 
p. 54 – role of advisory board

Financial Management of Minnesota Council of Nonprofits' Principles and Practices for Nonprofit Excellence
Minnesota Council of Nonprofits (MCN)

Navigating the New Auditing Standards
Kate Barr Nonprofits Assistance Fund (NAF) Reprinted from the Nonprofit Quarterly (http://www.npqmag.org), 2007
p. 1-2 – the new SAS112 standards
p. 2-4 – its impact
p. 4 – managing under SAS112

2009 Form 990 – Significant Changes
United States (US) Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Department of the Treasury

TY 2009 Form 990 – Forms and Instructions
IRS

On-Line Mini-Courses – Redesigned Form 990
IRS

Financial Policy Guidelines Nonprofits Assistance Fund (NAF)

E4. Determine and periodically review the amount of funding needed to sustain the mentoring program.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring. 
p. 62

Getting Started with Program Sustainability
Mentoring Fact Sheet Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p.2

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: A Guidebook to Program Development
Michael Garringer, Mark Fulop and Vikki Rennick National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP)
p. 71-74 – resource assessment

Sustainability Planning and Resource Development for Youth Mentoring Programs: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Craig Bowman, Miki Hodge, Renee Hoover, Patti MacRae, Phyllis McGrath, Beth Senger, Dennis Wakeland, and Dr. Susan G. Weinberger National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence (HFI)
p. 13-20 – assessment

E5. Establish a resource development plan that includes diverse sources of potential funding.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V Tab B
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 57-58; 65; 75-76

Finding Funding: A Guide to Federal Sources for Out-of-School Time and Community School Initiatives
Nancy D. Reder The Finance Project
p. 11-13 – federal funding

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: A Guidebook to Program Development
Michael Garringer, Mark Fulop and Vikki Rennick National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP)
p. 69-70; 75-77 – resource development committee and plan

Fund-Raising Forum Library Tony Poderis © Copyright 1997 - 2009, Tony Poderis All rights in all media reserved.

Money Raised through Volunteer Labor
Written by Susan J. Ellis, 2003
Found in the Energize website library at: http://www.energizeinc.com/art.html

Grants for Nonprofits: Children and Youth
website created and maintained by Michigan State University Libraries
Funding opportunities for nonprofits working with children and youth.

Chapter 42: Getting grants and financial resources
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010). Chapter 42: Getting Grants and Financial Resources. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/chapter_1042.htm
Section 1. Developing a Plan for Financial Sustainability
Section 2. Creating a Business Plan
Section 3. Developing a Committee to Help with Financial Sustainability
Section 4. Applying for a Grant: The General Approach
Section 5. Writing a Grant

Sustainability Planning and Resource Development for Youth Mentoring Programs: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Craig Bowman, Miki Hodge, Renee Hoover, Patti MacRae, Phyllis McGrath, Beth Senger, Dennis Wakeland, and Dr. Susan G. Weinberger NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 5-7 – guiding principles of resource development
p. 8 – more tips for sustainability
p. 10-12 – key steps in sustainability planning
p. 21-32 – creating a resource development plan
p. 33-92 – approaches to specific funding sources (corporation, foundation, government, individual, events)
p. 93-109 – board’s role in resource development
p. 120-125 – worksheets for planning

Getting Started with Program Sustainability
Mentoring Fact Sheet Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 2-3

Show Us the Money: Fundraising Fundamentals for Mentoring Programs
The Mentoring Plus Workshop Series Barbara E. Webster The Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Group, Inc.
p. 1-1 to 1-3 – the multiple goals of fundraising
p. 1-4 to 1-6 – Developing a diverse revenue base
p. 2-5 to 2-6 – reasons for giving to mentoring programs
p. 2-12 to 2-13 – sources of funding
p. 3-1 to 3-5 – grants, business income, events and individual donation pros and cons
p. 3-6 to 3-8 – organizational stages and fundraising methods, charitable giving facts
p. 4-1 to 4-7 – Asking process
p. 5-2 to 5-3 – Events
p. 5-4 to a presumed 5-7 (pages unmarked)
p. 6-1 to 6-3 – readiness and being prepared for funders
p. 6-4 to 6-5 – developing a case statement
p. 6-6 – fund development plan
p. 6-7 to 6-11 – most information is on reporting requirements
p. 6-12 – what board members can do
p. 7-2 to 7-4 – future trends of fund development
p. 8-2 to 8-3 – how to leave a legacy right after module 8 is a Resource section – including publications and internet addresses
p. 85-end of the pdf (pages are not marked) is the PPT

Sustaining Program Viability: Fund-development principles to assure your mentoring program’s future
Barbara Webster The EMT Group, Inc.
p. 1-2 – goals of fund development
p. 2-6 – diversifying funding base
p. 7 – key elements of leading organization to sustainability
p. 8 – recommended reading Council of Foundations

Compass Point Research & Publications

Writing a Mentoring Proposal
Dr. Linda Phillips-Jones © 2010 CCC/The Mentoring Group, http://www.mentoringgroup.com
What to include, common mistakes

E6. Develop mutually beneficial partnerships and collaborations with other organizations.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V Tab B
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 63-64, 67

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 12-13, 84-85

Sustainability Planning and Resource Development for Youth Mentoring Programs: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Craig Bowman, Miki Hodge, Renee Hoover, Patti MacRae, Phyllis McGrath, Beth Senger, Dennis Wakeland, and Dr. Susan G. Weinberger NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 7

Creating and Maintaining Coalitions and Partnerships
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010). Creating and Maintaining Coalitions and Partnerships. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/dothework/tools_tk_1.htm

Helping Young People Succeed: Strengthening and Sustaining Relationships between Schools and Youth Development Organizations
Irv Hatz, Elizabeth L. Hale and Martin J. Blank National Collaboration for Youth, Coalition for Community Schools and Institute for Educational Leadership
p. 5-6 – youth development research
p. 8-10 – what works, what doesn’t and what needs to happen between schools and the community
p. 11 – Table 1: Features of positive Developmental Settings
p. 12 – Table 2: Personal and Social Assets That Facilitate Positive Youth Development
p. 13-14 – Table 3: National Assembly Findings: School/Community Collaborations Matrix
p. 15-16 – resources and publications

Building Community Partnerships: Tips for Out-of-School-Time Programs
Research Brief Mary Burkhauser, Jacinta Bronte-Tinkew and Elena Kennedy Child Trends
p. 1-2 – community involvement and its benefits
p. 2-3 – how to identify valuable community resources
p. 3-5 – strategies to gain access to community resources and build partnerships
p. 6 – resources
p. 7 – a program in the spotlight

The ABCs of School-Based Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Jucovy and Michael Garringer NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 21 – partnership goals worksheet

Chapter 24: Improving Services
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010). Chapter 24: Improving Services. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/chapter_1024.htm
Section 3. Promoting Coordination, Cooperative Agreements, and Collaborative Agreements Among Agencies
Section 4. Developing Multisector Collaborations

E7. Understand and follow ethical, professional and legal standards related to fundraising.

Ethics and fundraising
Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP)

Sustainability Planning and Resource Development for Youth Mentoring Programs: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Craig Bowman, Miki Hodge, Renee Hoover, Patti MacRae, Phyllis McGrath, Beth Senger, Dennis Wakeland, and Dr. Susan G. Weinberger NMC: NWREL and HFI p. 111-117

Documents:
Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section I-IV, Tab A
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.

Financial Planning
Budget Items for a Mentoring Program (Word, 25k)
Financial Internal Controls Checklist (Word, 24k)

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V, Tab B
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.

Resource Development
Tips for Developing Relationships with Funders (Word, 35k)
Diversify Fundraising Strategies: Ensure Long-Term Program Sustainability (Word, 24k)
Foundation Letter (Word, 24k)
Donor Thank You Letter (Word, 25k)
Donation Thank You Letter with Mentee Insert (Word, 21k)
Donation Thank You Letter with Mentor Insert (Word, 21k)

Collaboration
Seven Keys to Successful Collaborations (Word, 3k)

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F. Develop systems for managing program information and data

F1. Implement policies r/t collection, use, storage, dissemination and destruction of program data.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 55-56, 65-66

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence (HFI)
p. 38-39

F2. Establish a process for managing and monitoring access to program financial information.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring. 
p. 55

Sustainability Planning and Resource Development for Youth Mentoring Programs: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Craig Bowman, Miki Hodge, Renee Hoover, Patti MacRae, Phyllis McGrath, Beth Senger, Dennis Wakeland, and Dr. Susan G. Weinberger NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 31

F3. Develop protocols for data privacy and security, and communicate them w/ staff, volunteers and program participants.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring. 
p. 56

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 40-43 – confidentiality policy

F4. Establish a process for managing program personnel records.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring. 
p. 56

F5. Develop protocols for managing information about program participants, identifying what data is collected & tracked for mentors, for youth and for families.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring. 
p. 58-59

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 38-39

F6. Maintain records r/t to mentoring matches, including staff contacts with program participants, attendance at program activities, tracking of match progress and demographic updates.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring. 
p. 56

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 48

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 34-35, 118-121

F7. Adhere to reporting requirements for funders, grants, advisory group, Board, Annual Report and other stakeholders.

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae NMC: NWREL and HFI 
p. 66-71

Sustainability Planning and Resource Development for Youth Mentoring Programs: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Craig Bowman, Miki Hodge, Renee Hoover, Patti MacRae, Phyllis McGrath, Beth Senger, Dennis Wakeland, and Dr. Susan G. Weinberger NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 54-56, 63-64, 83-84, 89, 97-99

Reporting Financial Information to the Board
Nonprofits Assistance Fund
(NAF)
p.1 – what every board needs to know
p. 2 – reporting and presenting to the board

Documents:
Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V, Tab B
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring. 
Program Information Management
Mentoring Activity Log (Word, 29k)
Mentor's Monthly Report (Word, 25k)

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G. Establish a marketing/public relations effort

G1. Communicate program success, accomplishments and needs to program participants stakeholders and community.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring. 
p. 61-64, 67

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae NMC: NWREL and HFI 
p. 76-81

Going to Market: Marketing Concepts for Mentoring Programs
Barbara E. Webster The Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Group, Inc.
p. 5-8

Guidebook for Successful Public Service Announcement (PSA) Media Campaign
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 6-7 – recruiting mentors through PSAs—why and best time?
p. 8-13 – 10 steps for placing PSAs
p. 14-15- building a timeline for planning a PSA
p. 16 – building media partnerships
p. 19-25 – templates

G2. Gather feedback from program participants staff, Board members and other stakeholders to identify accomplishments, successes and challenges.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring. 
p. 58-59, 63, 67

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 107

Section 7. Monitoring and Gathering Feedback from Your Mentoring Program
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010). Chapter 22, Section 7: Monitoring and Gathering Feedback from Your Mentoring Program. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/section_1211.htm

G3. Prepare and utilize a diverse communication plan that identifies target markets and outlines procedures and standards r/t marketing the program to potential participants and the community.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 61-63, 67

How to Get Noticed: Tips for Working with the Media
Mentoring Tactics 1:2 Dana Goodrow (2006) Center for Applied Research Solutions (CARS)
p. 2 – definitions related to media
p. 3 – media coverage’s importance
p. 4 – reaching the media
p. 5 – making the most of current events
p. 5-6 – how to make an announcement; media toolkit
p. 6 – getting publicity before, during and after an event
p. 7 – tools: how to write a media alert with an example
p. 8 – creating a press release
p. 8, 11 – guidelines to building a relationship with the media
p. 9-10 – 2 examples of a press release
p. 11 – becoming a source

Marketing for the Recruitment of Mentors: A Workbook for Finding and Attracting Volunteers
Linda Ballasy Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL)
p. 7-13 – marketing definition, customer focus and problem solving
p. 18-22 – pre-planning
p. 23-30 – marketing planning (components)
p. 31-33 – post-planning
p. 34-37 – marketing plan example
p. 39-44 – marketing communications introduction and overview
p. 45 – knowing your target audience
p. 47 – positioning and communications
p. 49 – developing your message
p. 52 – testing your message
p. 53 – crafting consistency into your message
p. 55 – making a lasting impression
p. 56 – choosing your media
p. 60 – promotional materials

Going to Market: Marketing Concepts for Mentoring Programs
Barbara E. Webster The Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Group, Inc.
p. 5-10

Chapter 6: Promoting Interest in Community Issues
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010). Chapter 6: Promoting Interest in Community Issues. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/chapter_1005.htm
Section 1. Developing a Plan for Communication
Section 2. Using Principles of Persuasion
Section 3. Preparing Press Releases
Section 4. Arranging News and Features Stories
Section 5. Approaching Editorial Boards (no link)
Section 6. Preparing Guest Columns and Editorials
Section 7. Preparing Public Service Announcements
Section 8. Arranging a Press Conference
Section 9. Using Paid Advertising
Section 10. Creating Newsletters
Section 11. Creating Posters and Flyers
Section 12. Developing Creative Promotions
Section 13. Creating Brochures
Section 14. Coordinating with National Awareness Weeks/Months (no link)
Section 15. Creating Fact Sheets on Local Issues
Section 16. Creating a Web Site
Section 17. Using E-mail Lists
Section 18. Using Direct Mail
Section 19. Handling Crises in Communication

G4. Promote program visibility by recognition of participant and program accomplishments and successes.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 63, 67

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 107, 112

Going to Market: Marketing Concepts for Mentoring Programs
Barbara E. Webster The EMT Group, Inc.
p. 1-end (10)

Documents:
Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V, Tab B
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
Public Relations/Communications and Marketing
Fulfillment Information for Mentoring Programs (Word, 25k)
Marketing Plan (Word, 31k)
Planning the Marketing of Your Mentoring Program (Word, 55k)
Marketing Your Mentoring Program Online (Word, 23k)
Working with the Media (Word, 27k)
Tips on Developing a Positive Relationship with the Media (Word, 24 k)
Special Considerations for the Mentoring Trade (Word, 3k)
Mentoring Vignettes (Word, 25k)
Mentor Program Flyer (PDF, 179k)
Mentor Recruitment Flyer 'Give and Get' (PDF, 435k)
Radio Public Service Announcement Scripts (Word, 25k)
Corporate Letter (Word, 22k)
School Superintendent Letter (Word, 31k)
Mentor Fact Sheet (Word, 22k)
Double Omega Standards of Use (Word, 272k)
Ideas for Mentoring Related Events (Word, 23k)

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H. Participate in mentoring advocacy efforts

H1. Build awareness at the community level to support greater understanding and support of mentoring program.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 61-63, 67

Chapter 30: Principles of Advocacy
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010). Chapter 30: Principles of Advocacy. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/chapter_1030.htm
Section 1. Overview: Getting an Advocacy Campaign Off the Ground
Section 2. Survival Skills for Advocates
Section 3. Understanding the Issue
Section 4. Recognizing Allies
Section 5. Identifying Opponents
Section 6. Encouraging Involvement of Potential Opponents as well as Allies
Section 7. Developing a Plan for Advocacy

Sustainability Planning and Resource Development for Youth Mentoring Programs: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Craig Bowman, Miki Hodge, Renee Hoover, Patti MacRae, Phyllis McGrath, Beth Senger, Dennis Wakeland, and Dr. Susan G. Weinberger NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 6, 9

H2. Stay informed about local, state and national developments in the field of mentoring and about opportunities to build awareness.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 59-60, 66

Chapter 31: Conducting Advocacy Research
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010).
Chapter 31: Conducting Advocacy Research . Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/chapter_1031.htm
Section 1. How to Conduct Research: An Overview
Section 2. Conducting Studies of the Issue
Section 3. Gathering Data on Public Opinion
Section 4. Studying the Opposition
Section 5. Requesting Accountability
Section 6. Demonstrating Economic Benefit or Harm
Section 7. Documenting Complaints
Section 8. Acting as a Watchdog
Section 9. Organizing Audits of Consumer Services
Section 10. Conducting Research to Influence Policy
Section 11. Organizing Study Circles

H3. Promote pro-mentoring public policies and funding

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 60, 66

Advocating for Mentoring
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.

Chapter 4: Getting Issues on the Public Agenda
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010). Chapter 4: Getting Issues on the Public Agenda . Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/chapter_1004.htm
Section 1. Developing a Plan for Getting Community Health and Development Issues on the Local Agenda
Section 2. Communicating Information about Community Health and Development Issues
Section 3. Gaining Public Support for Addressing Community Health and Development Issues
Section 4. Talking About Risk and Protective Factors Related to Community Issues
Section 5. Making Community Presentations

Chapter 34: Media Advocacy
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010). Chapter 34: Media Advocacy. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/chapter_1034.htm
Section 1. Working with the Media
Section 2. Making Friends with the Media
Section 3. Creating News Stories the Media Wants
Section 4. Using Paid Advertising
Section 5. Meeting the Media
Section 6. Changing the Media's Perspective on Community Issues

Chapter 33: Promoting a Direct-Action Campaign
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010). Chapter 33: Promoting a Direct-Action Campaign . Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/chapter_1033.htm
Section 1. Writing Letters to Elected Officials
Section 2. Writing Letters to the Editor
Section 3. Criticizing Unfavorable Action
Section 4. Filing a Complaint
Section 5. Seeking Enforcement of Existing Laws or Policies
Section 6. Using Personal Testimony
Section 7. Lobbying Decision makers
Section 8. Establishing Lines of Communication with the Opposition's Traditional Allies
Section 9. Conducting a Petition Drive
Section 10. General Rules for Organizing for Legislative Advocacy
Section 11. Developing and Maintaining Ongoing Relationships with Legislators and their Aides
Section 12. Registering Voters
Section 13. Conducting a Public Hearing
Section 14. Organizing Public Demonstrations
Section 15. Seeking a Negotiator, Mediator, or Fact-Finder
Section 16. Initiating Legal Action
Section 17. Organizing a Boycott
Section 18. Organizing a Strike
Section 19. Electronic Advocacy
Section 20. Advocacy Over and For the Long Term

H4. Follow local, state and national regulations regarding advocacy activities.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 60, 66

Advocacy Network
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.

Documents:
Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V, Tab B
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
Advocacy
Mentoring Advocacy Letter (Word, 29k)
Hosting Events with Legislators (Word, 21k)

Back to Top

Program Operations

I. Develop plan for recruiting mentors

I1. Define eligibility requirements for mentors.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 92-94, 109-110 125, 127

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section IV (I-IV)
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 15-18

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence (HFI)
p. 24-27

From Intention to Action: Strategies for Recruiting and Retaining Today's Volunteers
Research Corner Dr. Jean Rhodes Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.

Making the Most of Volunteers
Jean Baldwin Grossman and Kathryn Furano Public/Private Ventures (P/PV) Brief
p. 1 – introduction
p. 2-3 – background
p. 4-5 – screening
p. 6-7 – training and skills
p. 8-14 – ongoing management and support
p. 15 – summary and cost implications

The Virtual Volunteering Guidebook
Susan J. Ellis and Jayne Cravens Energize, Inc., Impact Online and Virtual Volunteer Project (Serviceleader.org) The Virtual Volunteering Guidebook, published in 2000, is a color PDF document offering detailed information on the basics of setting up and managing a successful virtual volunteering program. This book captures the contributions of many, many collaborating organizations and online volunteers who worked with the Virtual Volunteering Project from 1996 - 1998.
p. 1-6 – what is virtual volunteering, how to set it up
p. 8-14 – integrating the internet into volunteer management
p. 17-23 – virtual volunteering work design
p. 25-32 – recruiting online volunteers
p. 33-45 – selecting and preparing online volunteers
p. 49-56 – working with online volunteers
p. 58-64 – evaluating and recognizing service
p. 66-67 – implementing a virtual volunteer pilot program
p. 70-84 – special issues online
p. 88-93 – involvement of people with disabilities in virtual volunteering
p. 95-99 – conclusion
p. 112-121 – resources

Same-Race and Cross-Race Matching
Linda Jucovy (2002) Written by Public/Private Ventures, published by Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL)
p. 3-8 – arguments in support for cross-race and same-race matching with research findings
p. 9-13 – program considerations
p. 15-17 – training mentors in cultural understanding
p. 18-21 – training activities
p. 22-27 – word definitions

The Wisdom of Age: A Guide for Staff
Dr. Andrea Taylor Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 1-3 – why recruit mentors age years 50+
p. 3 – stereotypes
p. 4 – training activity
p. 5-6 – tips for engaging the three generations included in ages 50+
p. 6-7 – implications for monitoring
p. 7-8 – death of a mentor
p. 9-11 – training older mentors

When Stakes Are High: Research-based Mentoring for Youth with Multiple Risk Factors
Regional Training material Brenda Ingram, Denise Johnston and Dustianne North (2003) The Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Group, Inc.
p. 1:3 – defining high risk
p. 1:5-1:11 – development and trauma
p. 1:12-1:16 – developmental interventions and mentoring
p. 2:3-2:7 – research findings on the impact of mentoring on youth
p. 2:8-2:9; 2:17 – cautions about mentoring
p. 2:10-2:13 – mentoring theory-how mentoring works
p. 2:14; 2:18 – recommended practices
p. 2:15-2:19 – risk and summary
p. 3:2-3:3 – risk self-assessment
p. 3:4-3:7 – classification of mentoring programs
p. 3:8-3:18 – best practices for practices (long range plan-recruitment to closure)
p. 3:19 – examples of low risk programs
p. 3:20 – who are the mentors?
p. 3:21 – program structure
p. 3:22-3:23 – training
p. 3:30 – reflective supervision p. 3:31 – program evaluation
p. 4:2-4:8 – scenarios with high-risk youth

I2. Recruit eligible mentors using diverse recruitment strategies that realistically portray the benefits, practices and challenges of mentoring in the program and that are appropriate for the mentoring program and its participants.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 94-95, 109, 117, 119

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 19-25 – worksheets, qualities of and target groups re: mentors, recruitment message

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 20 – questions to ask as to what kind of mentors the program needs/wants
p. 20-21 – example of a recruitment policy
p. 62-63 – mentor job description
p. 64-65 – example of recruitment plan

Recruitment: A Strength-Based Approach
Regional training material Elsy Arévalo, Jerry Sherk and Erika Urbani (2006) The Center for Applied Research Solutions (CARS)
p. 3-19 – recruitment best practices
p. 21 – 3 step recruitment plan
p. 22-39 – market research and mentor survey findings
p. 39-84 – targeted recruitment (men, baby boomers, ethnically diverse, faith-based, corporate, college students, general recruitment)
p. 88-89 – resources

Tips: Spreading the word: 40+ ways to reach people
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010). Chapter 23, Section 6, Tools & Checklists: Tips: Spreading the word: 40+ ways to reach people. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/sub_section_tools_1876.htm

Developing Media Messages for Volunteer Programs
Points of Light Foundation
No page numbers--contents include:
Developing messages that resonate
What is included in a media message?
Why develop a media message?
How to create one—Worksheets
When media messages can be used
Where to get more information

Mentoring Across Generations: Engaging Age 50+ Adults as Mentors
Andrea Taylor MENTOR Research in Action Issue 8 Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 4-5; 17-19

Marketing for the Recruitment of Mentors: A Workbook for Finding and Attracting Volunteers
Linda Ballasy Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL)
p. 32, 35-37 – various types of communication channels available
p. 57-70 – include ways how the recruitment message is delivered
p. 71-73 – resources and references on more marketing communications topics
Appendix B (no page numbers)
Worksheet 5 – Recruitment Goals
Worksheet 9 – Marketing Plan Timeline
Worksheet 11 – Mentor Recruitment/Marketing Tracking Form

Guidebook for Successful Public Service Announcement (PSA) Media Campaign
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 6-7 – recruiting mentors through PSAs—why and when is the best time?
p. 8-13 – 10 Steps for Placing PSAs
p. 14-15 – building a timeline for planning a PSA
p. 16 – building media partnerships
p. 19-25 – templates

Yes You Can: A Guide for Establishing Mentoring Programs to Prepare Youth for College
Andrew Lauland U.S. Department of Education
p. 22-25

Section 2. Recruiting Mentors for Your Programs
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010). Chapter 22, Section 2: Recruiting Mentors for Your Programs. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/section_1199.htm

From Intention to Action: Strategies for Recruiting and Retaining Your Volunteers
Dr. Jean Rhodes Research Corner Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.

Effective Mentor Recruitment: Getting Organized, Getting Results
Michael Garringer Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS), Northwest Regional and Education Laboratory (NWREL) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 2-5 – why targeted recruitment is so important—what research says about effective targeted mentor recruitment
p. 7-12 – 10 Guiding principles of effective mentor recruitment
p. 13-25 – Chapter 2: Preparing to Recruit p. 13-15 – establish criteria for eligible mentors
p. 15-16 – create formal job description and recruitment locations
p. 17-19 – 2 examples of mentor job descriptions
p. 20 – inventory internal resources available or set aside for recruitment activities
p. 21-22 – identify potential volunteer motivations
p. 22 – analyze recruitment barriers and prepare a response
p. 22-23 – have policies and procedures in place and ready to use
p. 23-25 – example of school-based recruitment plan
p. 27-41 – Chapter 3: Recruitment Methods
p. 27-34 – using marketing methods to recruit
p. 35-37 – common mentor recruitment strategies
p. 37-38 – National Mentoring Month and state partnership tie-ins
p. 38-39 – national and community resources/events
p. 40-41 – additional recruitment strategies
p. 43 – making a recruitment plan
p. 44-53 – sample recruitment plan
p. 55-56 – references
Appendix A – A-1 to A-12 recruitment tools
Appendix B – B-1 to B-4 additional reading and resources

I3. Regularly review and refine mentor recruitment plan strategies and goals.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 109

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V Tab B
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 79-82, 85-87

Going the Distance: A Guide to Building Lasting Relationships in Mentoring Programs
Dr. Susan Weinberger, Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS), Northwest Regional and Education Laboratory (NWREL) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 11-12 – target recruitment of volunteers

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 61 – example of recruitment procedure

Marketing for the Recruitment of Mentoring volunteers: A Workbook for Finding and Attracting Volunteers
Linda Ballasy NWREL
p. 31-37 – includes example of marketing plan and timeline
Appendix B (no page numbers)
Worksheet 2 – Generic Marketing Project Schedule

Going to Market: Marketing Concepts for Mentoring Programs
Barbara E. Webster The Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Group, Inc.
p. 1-2 – marketing, its relation to mentoring and benefit
p. 3 – key concept 1 – orient market to customers
p. 4 – key concept 2 – target population
p. 5 – key concept 3 – what is the exchange? The mutual benefit?
p. 6-7 – key concept 4 – marketing’s broad range of techniques
p. 8-10 – key concept 5 – developing the marketing plan

Documents:
Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI, Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
Recruitment
Tips for Recruiting and Retaining Your Mentors (Word, 23k)
Tips for a Mentor/Mentee Recruitment Package (Word, 24k)
Mentor Recruitment Plan (Word, 42k)
Proven Guidelines to Increase Response to Promotions and Recruitment Campaigns (Word, 25k)
CEO Letter (Word, 24k)
Goals for a Successful Mentor Recruitment Session (For workplace-based mentoring) (Word, 31k)
Mentor Volunteer Description: Bronx Connect (Word, 21k)
Mentor Position Job Description (Word, 22k)
Mentor Position Job Description (For friendship-based mentoring) (Word, 27k)
What Makes a Good Mentor? (Word, 25k)
Qualities of Successful Mentors (Word, 24k)
Release Time Statement (Word, 24k)

Back to Top

J. Develop plan for recruiting mentees

J1.Define eligibility requirements for mentees with an emphasis on youth whose needs best match the services offered by the program.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 95, 109

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section IV (I-IV)
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 15-18

Going the Distance: A Guide to Building Lasting Relationships in Mentoring Programs
Dr. Susan Weinberger, Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS), Northwest Regional and Education Laboratory (NWREL) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 13 – confirm youth involved are appropriate for the program

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence (HFI)
p. 24, 26-27

Yes You Can: A Guide for Establishing Mentoring Programs to Prepare Youth for College
Andrew Lauland U.S. Department of Education
p. 32-33

J2.Recruit eligible mentees using diverse recruitment strategies appropriate for the mentoring program and its participants.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 91, 95, 109

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 22

Section 4. Recruiting Youth to Your Mentoring Program
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010). Chapter 22, Section 4: Recruiting Youth to Your Mentoring Program. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/section_1203.htm

J3. Regularly review and refine mentee recruitment plan strategies and goals.

Going to Market: Marketing Concepts for Mentoring Programs
Barbara E. Webster The Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Group, Inc.
p. 1-2 – marketing, its relation to mentoring and benefit
p. 3 – key concept 1 – orient market to customers
p. 4 – key concept 2 – target population
p. 5 – key concept 3 – what is the exchange? The mutual benefit?
p. 6-7 – key concept 4 – marketing’s broad range of techniques
p. 8-10 – key concept 5 – developing the marketing plan

Documents:
Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI, Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
Recruitment
Tips for a Mentor/Mentee Recruitment Package (Word, 24k)
Proven Guidelines to Increase Response to Promotions and Recruitment Campaigns (Word, 25k)
CEO Letter (Word, 24k)
For Parents with Children in Mentoring Programs: Guidelines and Ground Rules (Word, 24k)
Mentor Position Job Description (Word, 22k)
What Makes a Good Mentor? (Word, 25k)
Qualities of Successful Mentors (Word, 24k)

Back to Top

K. Screen potential mentors

K1. Establish written policies for consistent screening processes including criteria for accepting and rejecting potential participants.

Screening Mentors
Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL)
Handouts: p. 31 – various possible statutory requirements for mentoring programs depending on program and geographic location

Yes You Can: A Guide for Establishing Mentoring Programs to Prepare Youth for College
Andrew Lauland U.S. Department of Education
p. 26-28

Running a Safe and Effective Mentoring Program
excerpt Elsy Arévalo and Rebecca Cooper (2002). Friends for Youth Mentoring Institute, Friends for Youth, Inc.

K2. Communicate w/ the mentors about expectations for the program and the match, including minimum commitment.

Designing an Effective Mentor Training The Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Group, Inc.
Overhead 6.3

Designing and Customizing a Mentor Training
Elsy Arévalo Center for Applied Research Solutions (CARS)
p. 28-31 – realistic expectations
p. 34-35 – self-awareness and owning expectations

K3. Mentors complete written applications.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 129-133, 151

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 58

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence (HFI)
p. 29-41

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 10-12 – mission, vision, program history
p. 28-29 – screening policy example
p. 62-63 – mentor’s job description example
p. 70-71 – narrative/explanation on screening procedures
p. 72 – mentor screening procedure example
p. 73-77 – application example Screening Mentors NWREL Handouts:
p. 8-12 – example of mentor application

K4. Conduct at least one reference check (personal and/or professional) on potential mentors.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 96

Screening Mentors
NWREL
Handouts: p. 14-19 – reference checks and possible questions to ask

K5. Perform at least one criminal background check on potential mentors (local, state and/or federal).

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 96-99, 110

Screening Mentors
NWREL
Handouts: p. 4, 21-23, 40-52 – criminal history record checks

Critical Child Safety Legislation: Child Protection Improvements Act (CPIA)
(http://mentoring.org)

American Camp Association
The American Camp Association has a resource that shows whether or not FBI criminal background checks are required for volunteers and the amount for processing these checks. To complete a search, enter your state and identify the row titled “State Allows FBI Checks”. Information is updated annually.

Screening and Background Checking FAQs
Nonprofit Risk Management Center

Conducting Criminal History Record Checks checklist
Nonprofit Risk Management Center

A State-by-State Look at Access to Nationwide Criminal Background Checks by Mentoring Organizations
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring MENTOR/National Mentoring Partnership performed an informal survey to determine barriers that mentoring organizations encounter when trying to access national background checks on potential mentors/volunteers. MENTOR asked each state agency (plus Washington, D.C.) in charge of managing criminal background checks about the process for a mentoring organization requesting a state and/or national record check. The link leads to their results.

F.B.I. Identity History Summary Checks
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), US Department of Justice (DOJ) An FBI Identification Record, often referred to as a Criminal History Record or Rap Sheet, is a listing of certain information taken from fingerprint submissions retained by the FBI in connection with arrests and, in some instances, federal employment, naturalization, or military service.

US Department of Education Mentoring Program’s Guide to Screening and Background Checks
Barbara Oliver and Patti MacRae Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS), Northwest Regional and Education Laboratory (NWREL) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 3-7 – responsibly managing risk in mentoring programs (liability, risk management)
p. 9 – effective mentor screening process 9 steps
p. 10 – applicant’s rights p. 11-12 – Step 1: orientation session
p. 13-16 – Step 2: application packet
Formal application, permission to do background check, disclosure and other data collection; check state requirements/regulations
p. 17-19 – Step 3: formal interview and reference checks Red flags for interviewers, shoulds and should nots, questions
p. 21-37 – Step 4: conducting criminal history record checks Cautions, Fair Credit Reporting Act, state, national and local records checks, Safety NET, sex offender and child abuse registries, private screening firms – pros/cons of each
p. 39-41 – Step 5: interpreting the results of record checks Disqualifying criteria and rejecting applicants on the basis of background checks Must provide individuals with documentation if rejecting candidate on the basis of documents provided by another agency
p. 43-48 – Step 6: additional screening mechanisms driving records, credit check, drug testing, home visits, confirmation of credentials, polygraphs
p. 49-50 – Step 7: pre-match training and moving toward the match Policies/procedures |
p. 51-53 – Step 8: match supervision Questions to ask at check-ins, caregiver/parents check-ins
p. 55-61 – screening peer mentors Step 1-8
Appendices A-C
Examples of applications, job descriptions, consent and release of information forms, screening and supervision policies, criminal background contact information and resources

K6. Check sex offender and child abuse registries for potential mentors.

SMART Office of Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering and Tracking Website

Child Abuse Registry

Is Checking Sex Offender Registries an Adequate Background Check? Nonprofit Risk Management Center

K7. Conduct at least one face to face interview with potential mentors.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 99, 151

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 58

K8. Support additional screening processes relevant to program (driver records for mentors who will transport mentees; home visits for mentors who will host mentees in their home; etc.)

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 110

US Department of Education Mentoring Program’s Guide to Screening and Background Checks
Barbara Oliver and Patti MacRae Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 43-48

Screening Mentors
NWREL
Handouts: p. 21-22

Child Sexual Abuse Risk Exposure Matrix
National Collaboration for Youth

Going Beyond the Background Check: The Status of Volunteer Screening in San Mateo County Youth-Serving Organizations
Sarah Kremer and Kara Johnson (2009). Friends for Youth's Mentoring Institute, Friends for Youth, Inc.
p. 5 – role of adults in the lives of youth today
p. 9 – SAFE training: results and impacts
p. 12 – national picture of child molestation
p. 13 – national volunteer screening survey

Volunteer Risk Management Tutorial Nonprofit Risk Management Center

Mentoring Essentials: Risk Management for Mentoring Programs
Dustianne North and Jerry Sherk The EMT Group, Inc.
Between Module 1 and Module 2 – Classification of Mentoring Types (level of risk) table
2-13 to 2-17 – legal liability
4-2 to 4-4 – strategize to reduce risk
6-2 to 6-5 – preventing crises
9-2 to 9-12 – preventing sexual abuse in mentoring programs
OM-1 to OM-13 – development of an operations manual

K9. Understand and follow the ethical, professional and legal standards related to background checks and screening, including respect for confidentiality and volunteer rights.

National Child Protection Act of 1993 Pub. L 103-209 Appendix A
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP)
OJJDP Summary: Guidelines for the Screening of Persons Working with Children, the Elderly, and Individuals with Disabilities in Need of Support, April 1998

Who should have access to the information we receive from criminal history record checks?
Nonprofit Risk Management Center

Screening Mentors
NWREL
Handouts: p. 23; 37-39

Documents:
Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI, Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
Guidelines
Recommended Mentor Screening Standards/Guidelines for Mentoring Programs (Word, 26k)
Mentor Application/Screening Process Overview (Word, 41k)
Prospective Mentor Requirements Checklist (Word, 21k)
Mentor Interview Form (Word, 20k)
Mentor Agreement (Word, 28k)
Volunteer Acceptance Letter (Word, 26k)
Letter to Inform of Non-Acceptance (Word, 22k)
Letter to Offer Volunteer Position Other Than Mentoring (Word, 21k)
For the Mentor
Cover Letter for Volunteer Application (Word, 20k)
Mentor Application (Word, 20k)
Mentor Release Statement (Word, 25k)
Mentor Reference Check Questions (Word, 22k)
Mentor Reference Check (to be mailed) (Word, 24k)

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L. Screen potential mentees

L1. Establish written policies for consistent screening processes including criteria for accepting and rejecting potential participants.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 104, 151

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 58

L2. Develop and administer applications/enrollment forms for mentees that include informed consent from parents/guardians.

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence (HFI)
p. 27-28; 40-43

Knee-Jerk Risk Management?
Nonprofit Risk Management Center

L3. Communicate w/ youth and/or families about expectations for the program and the match, including minimum commitment.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 104, 151

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 58

Documents:
Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI, Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
For the Mentee
Mentee Application (Word, 30k)
Mentee/Parent Contract (Word, 23k)
Teacher Recommendation Form (Word, 27k)
Parent/Guardian Permission Letter (for school-based mentoring) (Word, 26k)
Parent/Guardian Permission (Word, 24k)
Permisso de Padres (Word, 21k)

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M. Prepare mentors for match

M1. Provide an overview of the program, including program mission, goals and objectives.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 101, 135

Designing and Customizing Mentor Training
Elsy Arévalo Center for Applied Research Solutions (CARS)
p. 84-92 (training trainers)

Integrating a Youth-Centered Approach into Your Mentoring Program
Mentoring Tactics 1:5 Heather Laird (2006) Center for Applied Research Solutions (CARS)
p. 1 – youth development background
p. 2-3 – mission, vision and values
p.4 – recruitment, training, matching and supporting
p. 5 – mentee training and support p. 5-6 – program evaluation
p. 6-7 – fundraising and boards with young people
p. 7 – public relations, messaging
p. 8-9 – summary and resources

The Wisdom of Age: A Handbook for Mentors
Dr. Andrea Taylor Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 1-11 – introduction – recruiting people age 50+ to be mentors
p. 15-24 – training activities
p. 25-26 – support mentors
p. 27-28 – prepare young people
p. 29 – matching
p. 30-24 – icebreaker and generational activity

The Wisdom of Age: A Guide for Staff
Dr. Andrea Taylor Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 1-6 – Chapter 1: Getting Started – roles, guidelines, safety and more
p. 9-15 – Chapter 2: About Youth Today – development, negative influences, slang and more
p. 19-37 – Chapter 3: Building Mentor-Mentee Relationships – 1st meeting, goals, difficult issues, cultural sensitivity, relationship with mentee’s family and more
p. 31-37 – Chapter 3 continued – ethical issues, relationship building activities, online resources and more

M2. Review and clarify roles, responsibilities of mentors, including minimum commitment.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 101-102, 141

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section IV (I-IV) Tab A
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 49

Going the Distance: A Guide to Building Lasting Relationships in Mentoring Programs
Dr. Susan Weinberger, Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae
Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS), Northwest Regional and Education Laboratory (NWREL) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 13-18 – pre-match training: orientation; sample agenda

First Do No Harm: Ethical Principles for Youth Mentoring Relationships
Rhodes, J., Liang, B., & Spencer, R. (2009). First do no harm: Ethical principles for youth mentoring. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 40(5), 452-458.
p. 454-455

Designing and Customizing Mentor Training
Elsy Arévalo Center for Applied Research Solutions (CARS)
p. 28-35 – mentor’s expectations and its impact relationship building
p. 71-75 – code of conduct

Designing an Effective Training Program for your Mentors
The EMT Group, Inc.
Overhead 4.1-4.10

M3. Communicate about which program staff to contact if mentors are experiencing match problems or need additional support, including the role of staff in supporting program policies (example: mandated reporting policies).

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 101-102, 138

Overcoming Relationship Pitfalls
Mentoring Fact Sheet Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 1-5

Yes You Can: A Guide for Establishing Mentoring Programs to Prepare Youth for College
Andrew Lauland U.S. Department of Education
p. 40-41

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence (HFI)
p. 40-43 – confidentiality policy
p. 48-49 – mandatory reporting of child abuse and neglect policy
p. 124-127 – mandatory reporting on child abuse and neglect procedure

Designing and Customizing Mentor Training Elsy Arévalo Center for Applied Research Solutions (CARS)
p. 68-74 – policies and guidelines, i.e., code of conduct

State Statutes on Child Abuse and Neglect
Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Children's Bureau MN's Mandated Reporting Online Training MN Department of Human Services

M4. Provide training for mentors that include information, activities and reflection about topics appropriate and relevant to mentoring program (see checklist).

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 102, 137-140, 141-148

Building Relationships as a Guide for New Mentors: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Linda Jucovy NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 5-31 – 10 principles of effective mentoring
p. 32-34 – mentoring relationship cycle

Overcoming Relationship Pitfalls
Mentoring Fact Sheet Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 1-5

Mentoring: A Promising Strategy for Youth Development
Research Brief Susan M. Jekielek, Kristin A. Moore, Elizabeth C. Hair, and Harriet J. Scarupa Child Trends
p. 2-4 – impact on youth development
p. 4-5 – characteristics of successful mentoring programs
p. 5-7 – program practices that enhance quality mentoring

Designing and Customizing Mentor Training
Elsy Arévalo Center for Applied Research Solutions (CARS)
p. 30-35 – mentor’s expectations and its impact on relationship building
p. 36-44 – talking about and sorting through difficult issues
p. 48-55 – effective communication skills
p. 56-61 – setting boundaries
p. 62-63 – supporting and helping mentor-mentee relationships last

Designing an Effective Training Program for Your Mentors
The EMT Group, Inc.
Module 2 – tailoring training to promote adult learning
Module 3 – designing the training
Module 4 – mentoring—why? what is it? characteristics of a mentor
Module 5 – understanding youth development
Module 6 – mentor’s tasks and important mentoring skills (i.e., communication, problem solving)
Module 7 – building effective relationships and its stages
Module 8 – closure

Section 3. Training Adult Mentors
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010). Chapter 22, Section 3: Training Adult Mentors. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/section_1201.htm

Section 5. Building Youth/Mentor Relationships
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010). Chapter 22, Section 5: Building Youth/Mentor Relationships. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/section_1208.htm

Section 6. Youth Goal Setting
KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2010). Chapter 22, Section 6: Youth Goal Setting. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved November 16, 2009, from: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/section_1209.htm

Incorporating an Understanding of Youth Culture and Development into Your Mentor Program
Dustianne North and Maggie Steele Center for Applied Research Solutions (CARS)
between p. 12 and 13 – developmental stages for children/youth p. 13 and chart on next page – milestones in development and learning
p. 14-15 – Youth Development approach explanation
p. 30 and pages before p. 31 – handouts on youth development – relationship building indicators, building a safe environment, steps in expanding a youth participation program and attitudinal principles to maximize youth participation
p. 31-44 – The world of adolescents: What we need to know to work more effectively with them

Supporting Families With Incarcerated Parents: Strengthening Families
Family Strengthening Policy Center (FSPC), National Human Services Assembly
p. 1 – introduction
p. 2-3 – the facts and what puts families at risk
p. 3 – protective factors
p. 3-5 – program models
p. 5-6 – policies and policy recommendations
p. 6-7 – resources and references
p. 8 – Appendix A: supports for incarcerated parents
p.9 – Appendix B: model of predictors of children’s adjustment following parent’s reconnection
p. 10 – Appendix C: possible developmental effects
p. 11-12 – Appendix D: initiatives related to families of inmates
p. 13-14 – Appendix E: provision of parenting and parent-child programs in men’s and women’s prisons

Mentoring Children of Prisoners
Dr. Jean Rhodes Research Corner Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.

Getting to the Gold
Annetta Miller Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 2-4 – an article on goal setting, relationship development and ethical issues mentors face and how staff can support mentors

Yes You Can: A Guide for Establishing Mentoring Programs to Prepare Youth for College
Andrew Lauland U.S. Department of Education
p. 29-31

Helping Your Mentees Develop Capabilities (Part 1)
Dr. Linda Phillips-Jones © 2010 CCC/The Mentoring Group, http://www.mentoringgroup.com

Helping Your Mentees Develop Capabilities (Part 2)
Dr. Linda Phillips-Jones © 2010 CCC/The Mentoring Group, http://www.mentoringgroup.com

Preparing Participants for Mentoring-US Department of Education Mentoring Program’s Guide to Initial Mentor’s Training Manual
Amy Cannata, Michael Garringer, Judy Taylor and Elsy Arévalo Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS), Northwest Regional and Education Laboratory (NWREL) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 1-3 – the value of pre-match training
p. 5 – trainer roles
p. 6-11 – principles of adult and youth learning
p. 12-15 – questioning, brainstorming and role plays
p. 16-24 – preparation and working with outside trainers
p. 25-34 – mentor training topics: program-related information
p. 35-49 – relationships skills p. 50-52 – additional information for parents and youth
p. 53-61 – sample forms (agendas, planning form)
p. 63-64 – references

Mentoring Immigrant Youth
Dr. Jean Rhodes Research Corner Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.

Mentoring Immigrant and Refugee Youth Toolkit
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 5-14 – introduction
p. 17-27 – needs assessment, parameters
p. 31-38 – running a mentoring program for immigrant youth
p. 41-52 – recruiting, screening and training mentors
p. 55-63 – training, supporting and evaluating
p. 67-71 – resources

Supporting Military Kids During Deployment
Mona Johnson Tough Topic Series: Learning and Teaching Support, Issue 1 National Guard Child and Youth Program Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
p. 1 – stages of deployment
p. 2 – symptoms of deployment related stress; strengths that develop as an outcome

Helping Kids Cope with Stress
Mona Johnson Tough Topic Series: Learning and Teaching Support, Issue 2 National Guard Child and Youth Program Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
p. 1 – signs of stress according to degree of development
p. 2 – age specific strategies to help kids cope

Impact of Grief and Loss
Mona Johnson Tough Topic Series: Learning and Teaching Support, Issue 3 National Guard Child and Youth Program Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
p. 1 – grief/loss process and responses of a grieving young person
p. 2 – how to help

Mentoring Sexual Minority Youth: Technical Assistance Packet
Linda Jucovy (2000) Written by Public/Private Ventures (P/PV), published by Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL)
p. 1-8 – risks to be aware of
p. 9-11 – training mentors
p. 13-15 – resources
a1-a20 – appendix of handouts/readings for youth and programs

Mentoring Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Youth
Mentoring Tactics 1:1 Juan Barajas (2004) Center for Applied Research Solutions (CARS)
p. 2-4 – definitions
p. 4 – coming out model
p. 5 – needs of LGBT young people
p. 6 – self and organizational assessment
p. 7 – policies, screening and training
p. 8 – responding to a disclosure
p. 9 – “questioning” youth, confidentiality and parents
p. 10-11 – LGBT mentors, scenarios
p. 11-12 – summary and resources

Spanning the Gender Gap in Mentoring
Dr. Jean Rhodes Research Corner Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.

Fostering Positive Outcomes
Dr. Jean Rhodes Research Corner Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring. How mentors can help adolescents in foster care

Foster Youth Mentorship Training for Program Managers
Mentoring Plus Workshop Series Dustianne North and Brenda Ingram The EMT Group, Inc.
p. 3:6-3:10 – mentors communicating and interacting with mentees
p. 3:11 – checklist for mentoring programs for providing resource assistance to mentees
p. 3:14-3:19 – red flags
p. 4:5-4:6 – life after foster care
p. 6:4-6:11 – importance of a clinical component
p. 6:12-6:13 – mentee training topics
p. 6:14-6:15 – keeping matches together when placement changes
p. 6:16 – evaluating the success of your foster care mentoring program

Documents:
Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section I-IV, Tab A
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
Establishing Goals and Objectives and Worksheet (Word, 25k)
Mentoring Program Outline and Worksheet (Word, 29k)

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI, Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.

Orientation - Tips and General Information
Developing an Orientation Plan (Word, 3k)
For the Mentor
Mentor Guidelines and Code of Conduct (Word, 54k)
Standards of Conduct for Volunteers (Word, 23k)
Mentor/Volunteer Procedures: Confidentiality (Word, 25k)
Mentors Want to Know (Word, 23k)
Characteristics of Children and Youth (Word, 51k)
Characteristics of High-Risk Students (Word, 24k)
Training
Mentor Training Agenda (Word, 25k)
Detailed Mentor Training Agenda (Word, 26k)
Mentor Training Evaluation (Word, 23k)
Pair Interview Questions (Word, 22k)
Guidelines for Mentors (Word, 25k)
Mentor Roles and Tasks (Word, 25k)
Tips for Building a Mentoring Relationship (Word, 24k)
Responsible Mentoring: Difficult Issues (Word, 37k)
Stages of a Mentoring Relationship (Word, 29k)
Communications Habits Checklist (Word, 3k)
Examples of Roadblocks to Effective Communication (Word, 21k)
Helpful Communication Skills (Word, 41k)
Exploring and Valuing Diversity (Word, 43k)
Mentor Training Letter of Completion and Certificate (Word, 21k)
Photo Release Form (Word, 24k)

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N. Prepare mentees and/or families for match

N1. Review and clarify roles, responsibilities and expectations of mentees and/or families, including minimum commitment.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 102-103, 108, 122-123

Preparing Mentees for Success – A Program Manager’s Guide
Dustianne North and Jerry Sherk The Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Group, Inc.
p. 1-10, 4-5

Yes You Can: A Guide for Establishing Mentoring Programs to Prepare Youth for College
Andrew Lauland U.S. Department of Education
p. 36-37

Back to the Basics: for Mentees, Part 1
Dr. Linda Phillips-Jones © 2010 CCC/The Mentoring Group, http://www.mentoringgroup.com

Back to the Basics: for Mentees, Part 2
Dr. Linda Phillips-Jones © 2010 CCC/The Mentoring Group, http://www.mentoringgroup.com

How Lifestyle Figures in an Appropriate Mentor Match
Nonprofit Risk Management Center Parental preference

Guide to Mentoring for Parents and Guardians example
Patti MacRae and Michael Garringer US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (Word, 2.15 MB)
p. 16-21 – parent’s role p. 24-35 – policies and procedures

N2. Communicate about which program staff to contact if mentees are experiencing match problems or need additional support.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 102-103, 121-123, 125

Guide to Mentoring for Parents and Guardians example
Patti MacRae and Michael Garringer US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (Word, 2.15 MB)
p. 21-22, 36

Training New Mentees: A Manual for Preparing Youth in Mentoring Programs
Judy Strother Taylor National Mentoring Center (NMC) and Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP)
p. 60

N3. Inform mentees and/or families about program rules and policies (i.e., mandated reporting policies).

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section IV (I-IV) Tab A
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 49

Training New Mentees: A Manual for Preparing Youth in Mentoring Programs
Judy Strother Taylor National Mentoring Center (NMC) and Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP)
p. 63

Preparing Mentees for Success – A Program Manager’s Guide
Dustianne North and Jerry Sherk The Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Group, Inc.
p. 1-10, 2-3 to 2-12

Guide to Mentoring for Parents and Guardians example
Patti MacRae and Michael Garringer US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (Word, 2.15 MB)
p. 24-35

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence (HFI)
p. 40-43 – confidentiality policy
p. 48-49 – mandated reporting policy
p. 124-127 - mandated reporting procedure

State Statutes on Child Abuse and Neglect
Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Children's Bureau

MN's Mandated Reporting Online Training
MN State Department of Human Services

N4. Provide training for mentees and/or families that include information, activities and reflection about topics appropriate and relevant to mentoring program, including how to handle difficult situations that arise in mentoring relationships (see checklist).

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 102-103, 121-123, 125, 127

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 42-45

Guide to Mentoring for Parents and Guardians example
US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (Word, 2.15 MB)
p. 18-21

Yes You Can: A Guide for Establishing Mentoring Programs to Prepare Youth for College
Andrew Lauland U.S. Department of Education
p. 40-41

Preparing Parents for the Mentoring Experience
Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS)

Preparing Mentees for Success Program Manager’s Guide
Dustianne North and Jerry Sherk The EMT Group, Inc.
p. 1-2 to 1-35 – building a community of caring
p. 2-2 to 2-17 – policies, confidentiality
p. 3-2 to 3-19 – how to develop material and train mentees
p. 4-2 to 4-12 – teaching and modeling life skills
p. 5-2 to 5-9 – role playing

Training New Mentees: A Manual for Preparing Youth in Mentoring Programs
Judy Strother Taylor NMC and OJJDP
p. 7-67

Preparing Participants for Mentoring: The USDE Mentoring Program's Guide to Initial Training of Volunteers, Youth, and Parents
Amy Cannata, Michael Garringer, Judy Taylor and Elsy Arévalo Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS), Northwest Regional and Education Laboratory (NWREL) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 5-24 – training basics
p. 25-55 – topics and agendas
p. 59-61 – training plan template
p. 58, 63-64 – resources

Documents:
Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI, Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
For the Mentee and Parent/Guardian
Orientation Agenda for Mentees and Parents/Guardians (Word, 28k)
Mentor Roles and Tasks (Word, 25k) Stages of a Mentoring Relationship (Word, 29k)
Tips for Intake and Orientation for Mentees and Parents/Guardians (Word, 25k)
Mentee Roles and Responsibilities and Worksheet (Word, 27k)
Photo Release Form (Word, 24k)

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O. Match mentors and mentees

O1. Establish criteria for matching mentors and mentees that considers relationship goals as well as the characteristics of the mentor and mentee.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 103, 151, 153

First Do No Harm: Ethical Principles for Youth Mentoring Relationships
Rhodes, J., Liang, B., & Spencer, R. (2009). First do no harm: Ethical principles for youth mentoring. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 40(5), 452-458.

Going the Distance: A Guide to Building Lasting Relationships in Mentoring Programs
Dr. Susan Weinberger, Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS), Northwest Regional and Education Laboratory (NWREL) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 19-22 – be prepared to offer summer activities and ensure space and are appropriate
p. 22-23 – develop a referral network
p. 25-28 – identify matching criteria, policies and procedures
p. 29 – meeting the mentee
p. 31-33 – monitor matches continuously; check in with mentors and mentees and their families
p. 34-35 – red flags to spot and provide help with
p. 36-37 – establish more than one pattern to have effective communication
p. 37 – keep caregivers involved
p. 37-38 – honor and recognize participants
p. 41-44 – peer mentoring programs—leadership, recruitment and pre-match training
p. 44-46 – making peer matches
p. 46-47 – ongoing support and supervision
p. 47-48 – keeping match going over summer and celebrate successes
p. 49 – conclusion
p. 50 – references
Appendix A: A1-A25 – sample forms
Appendix B: A27-A29 – additional reading

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence (HFI)
p. 111-114

The ABCs of School-Based Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Jucovy and Michael Garringer NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 37-38, 40

Why Youth Mentoring Relationships End
Renée Spencer MENTOR Research in Action Issue 5 Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 4-5; 11-14

Understanding and Facilitating the Youth Mentoring Movement
Rhodes, J.E., & DuBois, L.D. (2006). Understanding and Facilitating the Youth Mentoring Movement. Social Policy Report: Society for Research in Child Development, vol XX (III). Retrieved from: http://www.srcd.org/documents/publications/spr/spr20-3.pdf

Mentoring and Diversity
Dr. Linda Phillips-Jones © 2010 CCC/The Mentoring Group, http://www.mentoringgroup.com

Group Mentoring: A Study of Mentoring Groups in Three Programs
Carla Herrera, Zoua Vang and Lisa Y. Gale (2002) Public/Private Ventures (P/PV), Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 2-5 – Introduction
p. 7-19 – What is Group Mentoring?
p. 22-31 – Mentor-Youth Relationships in the Group Setting
p. 34-41 – Potential Benefits of Group Mentoring
p. 43-46 – Conclusion

O2. Program arranges and documents an initial meeting between mentors and mentees that is facilitated by a program staff.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 104

Going the Distance: A Guide to Building Lasting Relationships in Mentoring Programs
Dr. Susan Weinberger, Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS), Northwest Regional and Education Laboratory (NWREL) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 25-28 – identify matching criteria, policies and procedures
p. 29 – meeting the mentee

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 112-113

O3. Mentors complete match agreement forms that include terms and conditions of program participation.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 104

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 115

O4. Mentees and/or families complete match agreement that include terms and conditions of program participation.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 104

Going the Distance: A Guide to Building Lasting Relationships in Mentoring Programs
Dr. Susan Weinberger, Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS), Northwest Regional and Education Laboratory (NWREL) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 31-33 – monitor matches continuously; check in with mentors and mentees and their families
p. 37 – keep caregivers involved

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 116-117

Documents:
Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI, Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
Matching
Matching Recommendations (Word, 3k)
Matching Worksheet (Word, 3k)
Match Rationale Form (Word, 3k)
Tips and Considerations for the Matching Process (Word, 3k)
Mentor Match Agreement (Word, 3k)
Mentee Matching Form (Word, 3k)
Mentor Matching Form (Word, 3k)
Ice Breakers/Mixers (Word, 3k)
Getting to Know You (Word, 3k)
Building Relationships (Word, 3k)

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P. Provide ongoing support and recognition

P1. Program provides ideas and resources for match activities and/or hosts group or individual activities for mentors and mentees.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 104-105, 111

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 62-64, 67

Engaging Matches in Volunteer Service
Mentoring Fact Sheet Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 1-2 – why involve youth in service?
p. 2 – mentoring and developing volunteer service opportunities
p. 3 – finding quality service projects – help youth reflect on their achievements – supporting mentors
p. 6 – recognizing and celebrating accomplishments – references and resources
p. 7 – project ideas for schools or school sites

Resources for Online Mentoring or Online Tutoring
(www.serviceleader.org)

Providing Summertime Contact in School-Based Mentoring Programs
Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS)

P2. Program offers ongoing training opportunities for program participants.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 105, 111

First Do No Harm: Ethical Principles for Youth Mentoring Relationships
Rhodes, J., Liang, B., & Spencer, R. (2009). First do no harm: Ethical principles for youth mentoring. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 40(5), 452-458.

Making the Grade: A Guide to Incorporating Academic Achievement Into Mentoring Programs and Relationships
Amy Cannata, Michael Garringer, Patti MacRae and Dennis Wakeland Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS), Northwest Regional and Education Laboratory (NWREL) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 1-4 – introduction
p. 5-10 – what does research tell us: 2 core aspects what/how
p. 15-25 – after-school mentoring; tutoring v. mentoring; academic goals
p. 27-34 – academic—relational connections
p. 37-38 – importance of training
p. 38-41 – mentor’s part in promoting academic success
p. 42-46 – training handouts and activities
p. 47-49 – building trust with handout and activity
p. 50-52 – parent-mentor relationship with two handouts
p. 53-54 – connecting to school staff with handout
p. 55-57 – basic learning styles with handout
p. 59-63 – youth development with handout
p. 65-68 – setting goals and handout
p. 69-70 – activities with handout
p. 71-75 – tutoring within the mentoring context and handout
p. 76-88 – homework help, study habits and help with research
p. 89-98 – specific academic areas: elementary and middle school
p. 101-109 – career exploration and service learning
p. 111-114 – references
Appendix A: A1-A9 – programmatic comparison of tutoring and mentoring, sample memorandum of understanding and more

Going the Distance: A Guide to Building Lasting Relationships in Mentoring Programs
Dr. Susan Weinberger, Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae
Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS), Northwest Regional and Education Laboratory (NWREL) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 37-38 – honor and recognize participants
p. 46-47 – ongoing support and supervision
p. 47-48 – keeping match going over summer and celebrate successes
p. 49 – conclusion
p. 50 – references
Appendix A: A1-A25 – sample forms
Appendix B: A27-A29 – additional reading

Effective Mentoring Relationships: The Mentee’s Role (Part 1 of 2)
Dr. Linda Phillips-Jones © 2010 CCC/The Mentoring Group, http://www.mentoringgroup.com

Effective Mentoring Relationships: Mentee Role Assessment (Part 2 of 2)
Dr. Linda Phillips-Jones © 2010 CCC/The Mentoring Group, http://www.mentoringgroup.com

Ideas for Advanced Mentoring Training
Dr. Linda Phillips-Jones © 2010 CCC/The Mentoring Group, http://www.mentoringgroup.com

Effective Mentoring Relationships: The Mentor’s Role (Part 1 of 2)
Dr. Linda Phillips-Jones © 2010 CCC/The Mentoring Group, http://www.mentoringgroup.com

Effective Mentoring Relationships: Mentor Role Assessment (Part 2 of 2)
Dr. Linda Phillips-Jones © 2010 CCC/The Mentoring Group, http://www.mentoringgroup.com

Evidence Review: Mentoring for Children of Incarcerated Parents
http://www.nationalmentoringresourcecenter.org

Building from the Ground Up: Creating Effective Programs to Mentor Children of Prisoners
W. Wilson Goode, Sr. and Thomas Smith (2005) Public/Private Ventures (P/PV)
p. 1-5 – introduction
p. 7-18 – 8 questions for planning
p. 21-29 – program development
p. 31-36 – program management
p. 43-45 – resources, Amachi programs

The Pew Commission on Children in Foster Care  
The Pew Charitable Trusts

Foster Youth Mentor Training for Program Managers
Dustianne North and Brenda Ingram The Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Group, Inc.
p. 3-6 to 3-10 – materials to train mentors
p. 3-14 to 3-19 – red flags
p. 3-20 – icebreakers
p. 5-2 to 5-3 – promote trust in program
p. 6-4 to 6-11, 6-13 – importance of clinician/treatment team
p. 6-12 – mentee training
p. 6-14 to 6-15 – sustaining relationships during placement changes
p. 6-16 – evaluating success

Adoption and Foster Care Mentoring
Adoption and Foster Care Mentoring

Paving the Way to Work: A Guide to Career-Focused Mentoring for Youth with Disabilities
J. Timmons, M. Mack, A. Sims, R. Hare, and J. Wills National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability
p. 1-1 to 1-2 – value of quality mentoring
p. 1-3 – career preparation for work
p. 1-3 to 1-8 – mentoring in support of the “guideposts”
p. 2-1 to 2-2 – developmental context for youth in transition and challenges
p. 2-2 to 2-3 – building on youth development and leadership competencies
p. 2-4 – mentoring focus strategies
p. 2-5 to 2-6 – research findings and implications on transition
|p. 3-1 to 3-2 – labels, portrayal, people first language, things to be aware of
p. 3-3 to 3-6 – definitions and models of disability
p. 3-6 to 3-8 – non-apparent, mental health and emotional, specific learning, and other hidden disabilities
p. 3-8 – accommodations or assistive devices
p. 3-9 to 3-12 – federal legislation and people with disabilities
p. 3-13 to 3-14 – support mentors provide young people, etiquette
p. 4-1 to 4-7 – mentoring program settings and designs
p. 4-7 to 4-8 – mentoring for career preparation
p. 4-9 to 4-11 – guideposts mentoring activities that support young people in meeting developmental goals
p. 4-11 to 4-15 – resources
p. 5-1 to 5-9 – programs with these five foundations have been found to have long-term success
p. 5-10 to 5-24 – worksheets, forms
p. 6-2 to 6-8 – components of an effective evaluation system
p. 6-8 to 6-14 – sample evaluation
p. 7-1 to 7-5 – what is marketing? 4 steps to a marketing program
p. 7-6 to 7-8 – suggested marketing strategies
p. 7-9 to 7-13 – templates
Appendix 1: A1-A6 – state programs
Appendix 2: A7-A8 – disability organizations
Appendix 3: A9 to A13 – references

Best Practice Guide in Mentoring Youth with Disabilities
Eleanor Axelrod, Genelle Campbell and Ty Holt Partners for Youth with Disabilities
p. 1-1 to 2-13 – introduction and models
p. 3-1 to 3-18 – best practices for mentoring young people with disabilities
p. 4-1 to 4-24 – e-mentoring
p. 5-1 to 5-12 – building a program for youth with disabilities
p. 6-1 to 6-14 – sustaining program
p. 7-1 to 7-12 – evaluating program
p. 8-1 to 8-24 – promoting positive transitioning for youth with disabilities

Cultivating Leadership: Mentoring Youth with Disabilities
Office of Disability Employment Policy US Department of Labor

Responsible Mentoring: Talking about Drugs, Sex and Other Difficult Issues
The EMT Group, Inc.
p. 6 – basic guidelines for types of issues that mentors can handle alone
p. 24 – putting the mentee at ease
p. 26 – honoring mentee’s right to self-determination
p. 28 – problem solving and resources

Cyberbullying Toolkit for Tutors and Mentors
America Learns

America Learns Network Superstars
Top Strategies from On-the-Ground Tutors, Mentors & Teachers

Gender Specific Approaches in Mentoring
Mentoring Fact Sheet Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 1 – why understanding gender differences matters in mentoring
p. 1-2 – training mentors in gender-specific approaches
p. 2-3 – communicating with boys
p. 3-4 – communicating with girls
p. 5 – references and resources

Introduction to Youth Gangs Fact Sheet
The EMT Group, Inc.
p. 1 – what is a gang and why join?
p. 1-2 – what goes on in a gang? How do youth leave?
p. 3-4 – general guidelines for working with gang-affiliated young people
p. 5-6 – approaching and engaging gang-involved youth
p. 7-10 – gangs and identity
p. 11 – recognizing drug abuse
p. 13 – references and readings

Ongoing Training for Mentors - 12 Interactive Sessions for US Department of Education Mentoring Programs
Elsy Arévalo, Patti MacRae, Christian Rummell, Maija Ryan, Judy Strother Taylor, and Johnna Timmes Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS), Northwest Regional and Education Laboratory (NWREL) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 1-4 – introduction
p. 5-10 – boundaries
p. 11-15 – bullying
p. 17-22 – communication throughout stages of the relationship
p. 23-35 – how to handle difficult situations/crises
p. 37-46 – identity and impact on relationships
p. 47-56 – setting goals
p. 57-63 – adolescent health issues
p. 65-76 – homework
p. 77-80 – activities
p. 81-87 – mentee’s family
p. 89-96 – money and gifts
p. 97-108 – closure
p. 109-110 – about authors

Youth Development Approach: Looking for what’s Right with Adolescents
Prevention Tactics 2:2 Selena Polston The EMT Group, Inc.
p. 1 – youth development approach
p. 2 – skill-building, gaining 6 competencies
p. 3 – youth serving organizations and promoting youth development
p. 4 – six principles and practices of success
p. 5 – what you can do plus a self-assessment of strengths and challenges
p. 6 – resources

Crossing the Tracks: Building Relationships Across Socioeconomic Differences
Prevention Tactics 4:1 Barbara E. Webster The EMT Group, Inc.
p. 1 – building relationships across socioeconomic differences
p. 2 – debunking the “culture of poverty” theory—how does it affect us?
p. 3 – what is poverty?
p. 4 – barriers to crossing the tracks
p. 5 – self-assessment tool
p. 6 – focus on resilience
p. 7 – what can you do?
p. 8 – references and resources

P3. Program offers opportunities for mentors to meet each other, share ideas and provide support.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 106

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence (HFI)
p. 48-53

Yes You Can: A Guide for Establishing Mentoring Programs to Prepare Youth for College
Andrew Lauland U.S. Department of Education
p. 38-39

P4. Program regularly recognizes and thanks program participants for their contributions.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 106-107, 155

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 52-53

Recognition and Rewards for Youth Development Workers
E-Newsletter National Youth Development Learning Network
p. 1-2 – the value and benefits of applying recognition and rewards
p. 2 – lesson from the field
p. 3-4 – getting started—6 steps to intentionally designing a way of recognizing and rewarding staff

One Step Further: Agency Services and Agency-wide Education
Written by Susan J. Ellis, 2003 Found in the Energize website library at: http://www.energizeinc.com/art.html
On professional enrichment

Volunteer Recognition
Energize visitors "share what have been their most popular ways to recognize volunteers." © 2010 Found in the Energize website library at: http://www.energizeinc.com/art.html

National Volunteer Week Celebrations
Ideas on Recognition © 2004 Found in the Energize website library at: http://www.energizeinc.com/art.html

P5. Actively solicit feedback from mentors and mentees regarding their experiences and inquire about any additional support needed.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 107

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 58-59

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 36-37, 122-123

Documents:
Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI, Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
Activities
A Year’s Worth of Mentoring Activities (Word, 25k)
Why Are You So Special? (Word, 24k)
Who Am I? (Word, 22k)
What Will We Do Each Week? (Word, 31k)
Topics for Discussions Between Mentors and High School-Age Youth (Word, 22k)
Writing Goals and Objectives and Worksheet (Word, 33k)
Mentoring Activity Links (Word, 21k)
Sock Game (Word, 23k)
Find Someone Who (Word, 24k)
Practical Skills for Tutoring (Word, 29k)
Mentor Recognition
Recognition: A Calendar of Events (Word, 35k)
Recognition of Mentors (Word, 21k)
101 Ways to Give Recognition to Volunteers (Word, 31k)

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Q. Supervise and monitor mentoring relationships

Q1. Establish procedures for monitoring matches.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 104-107, 111-112

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 55-59, 63, 65-66

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section IV (I-IV) Tab A
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 18, 21, 25, 48

Going the Distance: A Guide to Building Lasting Relationships in Mentoring Programs
Dr. Susan Weinberger, Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS), Northwest Regional and Education Laboratory (NWREL) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 31-33 – monitor matches continuously; check in with mentors and mentees and their families
p. 34-35 – red flags to spot and provide help with
p. 37 – keep caregivers involved
p. 37-38 – honor and recognize participants
p. 38-39 – ensure closure to be a positive success
p. 41-44 – peer mentoring programs—leadership, recruitment and pre-match training
p. 44-46 – making peer matches
p. 46-47 – ongoing support and supervision
p. 47-48 – keeping match going over summer and celebrate successes
p. 49 – conclusion p. 50 – references
Appendix A: A1-A25 – sample forms
Appendix B: A27-A29 – additional reading

Keeping Matches Together
Dr. Jean Rhodes Research Corner Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.

Building Relationships as a Guide for New Mentors: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Linda Jucovy NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 5-31 – 10 Principles of Effective Mentoring

Creating and Sustaining a Winning Match
Dustianne North and Jerry Sherk The Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Group, Inc.
p. 2-6 – who supervises or supports who? Or who is in charge of what?
p. 2-7 to 2-8 – human relations specialist
p. 2-8 – continuity of contact personnel
p. 2-9 to 2-11 – one-to-one supervision of mentors
p. 2-13 – maintaining contact and monitor mentee & family’s participation
p. 2-14 to 2-17 – supervising groups

Making a Difference in the Lives of Youth
National Youth Development Information Center (NYDIC)

Tools for Evaluating Your Mentoring Program
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring. Sample from Mentoring Partnership of Long Island
p. 1-4

Q2. Program staff communicates on a regular basis with mentors about match quality and to offer support.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 106

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 48-53

First Do No Harm: Ethical Principles for Youth Mentoring Relationships
Rhodes, J., Liang, B., & Spencer, R. (2009). First do no harm: Ethical principles for youth mentoring. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 40(5), 452-458.

Fostering Close and Effective Relationships in Youth Mentoring Programs
Dr. Jean Rhodes MENTOR Research in Action Issue 4 Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 3-7, 13-19

Q3. Program staff communicates on a regular basis with youth and/or families about match quality and to offer support.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 106

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 48-53

Q4. Program staff is accessible to participants and available to work with matches to resolve problems.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 105-106, 111-112

Documents:
Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI, Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.

Ongoing Supervision
Relationship Development Checklist (Word, 33k)
Agency Match Support Outline (Word, 20k)
Mentor Feedback (Word, 28k)
Mentee Feedback (Word, 21k)
Teacher Survey (Word, 28k)
High School Mentor Activity Report (Word, 40k)
Coordinator Annual Log Match Meetings (Word, 40k)
Enhancement Training and Mentor Training (Word, 27k)

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R. Help mentors and mentees reach closure

R1. Develop and implement procedures to manage both anticipated and unanticipated match closures, including procedures for rematching mentors and mentees.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 104, 107-108, 112, 148, 157-159

Going the Distance: A Guide to Building Lasting Relationships in Mentoring Programs
Dr. Susan Weinberger, Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS), Northwest Regional and Education Laboratory (NWREL) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 38-39 – ensure closure to be a positive success

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 54-56

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 34-35 – match support and supervision policy
p. 118-121 – match supervision and support procedure

Mentoring Relationships: 7 Tips for Coming to Closure
Leadership Development Services Article from Mentoring & Protégé Vol. 9. No. 4. Fall 1999.

Avoiding Early Match Termination Mentoring Fact Sheet
Mentoring Fact Sheet Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.

R2. Conduct exit interviews with mentors.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 108, 112

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 132

R3. Conduct exit interviews with mentees.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 108, 112

Generic Mentoring Program Policy and Procedure Manual: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Linda Ballasy, Mark Fulop and Michael Garringer NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 133-134

R4. Ensure mentors, mentees (and families when appropriate) understand program policy regarding communication and contact between mentors and mentees after match closure.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 108, 112

Documents:
Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VI, Tab C
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
Structured Match Closure
Mentee/Mentor Termination Ritual (Word, 27k)
Terminating Relationships (Word, 22k)
Closure (Word, 22k)
Closure Interview Form (Word, 21k)

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Program Evaluation

S. Determine what elements of program progress to measure

S1. Identify expected mentee-level changes (outcomes) that represent program goals.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VII
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 165, 169

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section IV (I-IV)
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 17-18, 21, 25

Measuring Outcomes
(Module 5) Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL)
p. 13-14 – program goals or 'desired outcomes'
p. 20 – 22 – explanation of outcome measurement
p. 27 – value of outcome measurement
p. 27-28 – lessons about effective implementation by agencies
p. 29-30 – lessons about useful roles for funders
p. 30-31 – lessons about using outcome findings in resource allocation
p. 31-32 – lessons about limitations of outcome measurement
p. 33-34 – challenges for the future
p. 41 – benchmarks definition
p. 42 – table of contents of handouts

S2. Identify expected mentor-level changes (outcomes) that represent program goals.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VII
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 165, 169

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 17-18, 21, 25

S3. Identify what success looks like (indicators of success) for mentee outcomes.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VII
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 165, 169

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 17-18, 21, 25

S4. Identify what success looks like (indicators of success) for mentor outcomes.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VII
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 165, 169

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 17-18, 21, 25

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: A Guidebook to Program Development
Michael Garringer, Mark Fulop and Vikki Rennick National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP)
p. 80-82 – determine what to measure and what the indicators are

S5. Identify program processes (such as activities, # youth served, length of matches, etc.) essential to achieving goals.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VII
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 163, 166

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section V
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 16-21, 58-59, 66

S6. Identify indicators of success for program processes.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VII
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 165

The Program Manager’s Guide to Evaluation Chapter 5: How do you prepare for an evaluation?
US Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children & Family, Office of Planning, Research & Evaluation (US ACF OPRE)

Defining Success
Building Blocks of Quality Mentoring Programs Mentoring Canada Big Brothers Big Sisters of Canada

Outcome-Based Evaluation: A Training Toolkit for Programs of Faith
FASTEN (Faith & Service Technical Education Network) © Performance Results, Inc., Gaithersburg, Maryland

Random Assignment Evaluation Studies: A Guide for Out-of-School Time Program Practitioners
Kristin Anderson Moore and Allison Metz Research Brief Child Trends

Glossary for Common Evaluation terms
Online Evaluation Resource Library (OERL)

Documents:
Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section I-IV, Tab A
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
Program Implementation Timeline (Word, 52k)
12-Month Activity Calendar (Word, 23k)
Writing a Mission Statement (Word, 29k)
Establishing Goals and Objectives and Worksheet (Word, 25k)
Mentoring Program Outline and Worksheet (Word, 29k)

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T. Determine how the program will measure progress and collect data

T1. Identify or develop sources of data for measuring program processes, such as program records, mentoring logs, financial records, etc.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VII
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 165-166, 169

The Program Manager’s Guide to Evaluation Chapter 6: What Should You Include in an Evaluation Plan?
US Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children & Family, Office of Planning, Research & Evaluation (US ACF OPRE)

T2. Select or design evaluation instruments to measure mentor & mentee outcomes, such as surveys, interviews or observations.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VII Tab D
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 166-169, 173-177

Evaluation Instrument Toolkit
from Oregon Mentors - also Veiw Other Online Collections

What's Working? Tools for Evaluating Your Mentoring Program
Beki Saito, Search Institute

Overview of Methods to Collect Information
Written by Carter McNamara, MBA, PhD, Authenticity Consulting, LLC. Copyright 1997-2008. FML

Measuring the Quality of Mentor-Youth Relationships
Linda Jucovy (2002) Written by Public/Private Ventures (P/PV), published by Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL)
p. 1-22

Documenting Progress and Demonstrating Results: Evaluating Local Out-of-School Time Programs
Little, P., DuPree, S., & Deich, S. (2002). Documenting Progress and Demonstrating Results: Evaluating Local Out-of-School Time Programs (Issues and Out-of-School Time Evaluation No. 3). Retrieved November 16, 2009 from http://www.hfrp.org/publications-resources/browse-our-publications/documenting-progress-and-demonstrating-results-evaluating-local-out-of-school-time-programs
p. 46-47 – data collection methods

The Survey System Survey Design
Creative Research Systems "This is the Survey Design chapter from The Survey System's Tutorial, revised May, 2009."

The Survey System Sample Size Calculator
Creative Research Systems Helps calculate how large of a sample needed to have for surveys in order to have strong confidence rates

T3. Develop a plan for collecting outcome and process data, including guidelines such as who is responsible for data collection, when tools should be administered, how data should be stored, how privacy will be assured if appropriate, etc.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VII
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 169

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: A Guidebook to Program Development
Michael Garringer, Mark Fulop and Vikki Rennick National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) 
p. 82-83 – determine who and how data will be collected

Documenting Progress and Demonstrating Results: Evaluating Local Outs-of-School Time Programs
Little, P., DuPree, S., & Deich, S. (2002). Documenting Progress and Demonstrating Results: Evaluating Local Out-of-School Time Programs (Issues and Out-of-School Time Evaluation No. 3). Retrieved December 16, 2009, from http://www.hfrp.org/publications-resources/browse-our-publications/documenting-progress-and-demonstrating-results-evaluating-local-out-of-school-time-programs
p. 28-31

Time to Evaluate
Dr. Linda Phillips-Jones © 2010 CCC/The Mentoring Group, http://www.mentoringgroup.com

Chapter 6: What should you include in an evaluation plan?
US ACF OPRE

T4. Develop a written plan or visual representation that describes program goals and objectives, participant outcomes, indicators of success, program activities and sources of evaluation data (example: logic model).

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VII Tab D
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 164; Example on p. 177

Tips for Successful Program Assessment & Evaluation
Oregon Mentors

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities
Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae NMC: NWREL and HFI
p. 10-11

Documenting Progress and Demonstrating Results: Evaluating Local Outs-of-School Time Programs
Little, P., DuPree, S., & Deich, S. (2002). Documenting Progress and Demonstrating Results: Evaluating Local Out-of-School Time Programs (Issues and Out-of-School Time Evaluation No. 3). Retrieved December 16, 2009, from http://www.hfrp.org/publications-resources/browse-our-publications/documenting-progress-and-demonstrating-results-evaluating-local-out-of-school-time-programs
p. 10; 17-23

Learning from Logic Models in Out-of-School-Time
Harvard Family Research Project (2002). Learning From Logic Models in Out-of-School Time. This brief is based on: Watson, S. (2000). Using results to improve the lives of children and families: A guide for public-private child care partnerships. Child Care Partnership Project. This publication is available at nccic.org/ccpartnerships/results.pdf. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Family Research Project. Retrieved December 15, 2009 from http://www.hfrp.org/publications-resources/browse-our-publications/learning-from-logic-models-in-out-of-school-time
p. 1-10

Logic Model Development Guide
W.K. Kellogg Foundation

Logic Models Workbook
Innovation Network, Inc.

Draft Logic Model for Magnet School Programs
Produced by the Education Alliance of Brown University and published online by the Evaluation Toolkit for Magnet School Programs website Sample evaluation toolkit for Magnet School programs

T5. Regularly collect data related to program processes (such as match records, staff supervision and monitoring records, financial records) as defined by the evaluation plan.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VII
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 163-164

Candidate Outcome Indicators: Youth Mentoring Program
Urban Institute
p. 1-6

Using Outcome Information-Making Data Pay Off
Elaine Morley and Linda M. Lampkin Urban Institute
p. 4-9, 19, 21

Chapter 7: How do you get the information you need for your evaluation?
US ACF OPRE

T6. Regularly collect program participant outcomes (such as surveys, interviews or observations) as defined by evaluation plan.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VII
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 163-164

Learning from Logic Models: An Example of a Family/School Partnership Program
Coffman, J. (1999). Learning from Logic Models: An Example of a Family/School Partnership Program (Reaching Results). Retrieved November 17, 2009, from http://www.hfrp.org/publications-resources/browse-our-publications/learning-from-logic-models-an-example-of-a-family-school-partnership-program

Promoting Accountability through Planning, Implementation and Evaluation
Matthew Chinman, Pamela Imm and Abraham Wandersman Research and Development (RAND)
p. 102-113

Key Steps in Outcome Measurement
Harry Hatry and Linda Lampkin Urban Institute
p. 27-28

Documents:
Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VII-VIII, Tab D
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
How to Select a Survey to Assess Your Adult-Youth Mentoring Program (Word, 44k)
Mentor Program Evaluations (Program Coordinator, Mentor, Mentee) (Word, 30k)
Teacher Report on the Match (Word, 56k)
Pre-Post Teacher Survey (Word, 48k)
Gauging the Effectiveness of Youth Mentoring Questionnaire (Word, 41k)
Youth Pre-Program Survey (Word, 47k)
Youth Follow-Up Survey (Word, 120k)
Mentor Evaluation Form (Mentee Impact) (Word, 65k)
Mentor Evaluation Form (Mentor Impact) (Word, 46k)
Mentor Program: Parent Survey (Word, 31k)
Logic Model (PDF, 657k)


The Improve Group™
The Improve Group™ Introduction to Logic Models (Word, 56k)
The Improve Group™ Logic Model Development (Word, 56.5k)
The Improve Group™ Data Collection Methods (Word, 69k)
The Improve Group™ Survey Models to Assess Change (Word, 79.5k) 

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U. Analyze evaluation data and use results to enhance program

U1. Analyze program process and outcome data at regular intervals (at minimum yearly) to identify trends and progress towards program goals and objectives.

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VII
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 167-168

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: A Guidebook to Program Development
Michael Garringer, Mark Fulop and Vikki Rennick National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP)
p. 82-830 – analyze data

Chapter 8: How do you make sense of evaluation information?
US Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children & Family, Office of Planning, Research & Evaluation (US ACF OPRE)

U2. Use findings from data analysis to refine the program practices.

Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring: A Guidebook to Program Development
Michael Garringer, Mark Fulop and Vikki Rennick National Mentoring Center (NMC) at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) and Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP)
p. 85-87 – use of data for program enhancement
Appendix A: A1-A9 – checklist of program progress
Appendix A: A15-A18 – sample timeline for new mentoring programs

Measuring the Quality of Mentor-Youth Relationships
Linda Jucovy (2002) Written by Public/Private Ventures (P/PV), published by Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL)
p. 23-26

Promoting Accountability through Planning, Implementation and Evaluation
Matthew Chinman, Pamela Imm and Abraham Wandersman Research and Development (RAND)
p. 96-103

Using Outcome Information-Making Data Pay Off
Elaine Morley and Linda M. Lampkin Urban Institute (UI)
p. 18-20

Using Mentoring Research Findings to Build Effective Programs
Patti MacRae and Michael Garringer, contributions by Dr. Michael Karcher and Dr. Thomas Keller Mentoring Resource Center (MRC), US Department of Education Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDS) and the Evaluation, Management and Training (EMT) Associates, Inc.
p. 1 – introduction
p. 2-16 – guide to key mentoring research and evaluation
p. 17-28 – FAQs on evaluation and research
p. 29-43 – Power Point slides of presentations on relationships and matching in school-based mentoring programs with more readings after these

U3. Share evaluation findings with program stakeholders (including participants, staff, Board members, funders, etc.).

Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Section VII
Mentoring.org (http://www.mentoring.org), published by the National Mentoring Partnership, covers issues on youth mentoring.
p. 169

Using Outcome Information-Making Data Pay Off
Elaine Morley and Linda M. Lampkin Urban Institute
p. 23-26

Key Steps in Outcome Measurement
Harry Hatry and Linda Lampkin Urban Institute
p. 29

Analyzing Outcome Information-Getting the Most from Data
Harry Hatry, Jake Cowan and Michael Hendricks Urban Institute
p. 31-36

Candidate Outcome Indicators: Advocacy Program
Urban Institute
p. 1-4

Chapter 9: How can you report what you have learned?
US ACF OPRE

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