Resources for Mentoring Programs

Resources for Mentoring Programs (83)

 
  • Description of Resource:

    The Preparing for Mentoring Program is an online pre-match training program designed for prospective mentors to prepare for their mentoring relationship. The program consists of a three-course sequence: Building the Foundation, which focuses on the importance of mentoring, a mentor’s role, and planning for the first meeting between a mentor and mentee; Ethics and Safety, which teaches mentors five ethical principles for youth mentoring; and Building and Maintaining the Relationship, which provides mentors ideas for deepening their mentoring relationship. These trainings are designed to be completed either before the mentor and mentee are matched or very early in the relationship.

    Goals:

    To prepare prospective mentors for their mentoring relationship and to equip mentors with strategies for developing a positive relationship with their mentee using reflective questions, interactive activities, and videotaped scenarios.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    Mentors and mentoring programs

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    Training, Match Support, Match Closure

    Key Personnel:

    N/A

    Additional Information:

    N/A

  • Resource Name:

    Preparing for Mentoring Program

    Publisher/Source:

    innovation Research & Training, Inc. (iRT)

    Author:

    innovation Research & Training, Inc. (iRT)

    Date of Publication:

    2017

    Resource Type:

    Mentor Training Resources








  • Study 1

    Evidence Classification:

    Promising

    Evaluation Methodology:

    Kupersmidt and Colleagues (2017) investigated the impact of an online pre-match training for mentors on mentor knowledge, preferences, attitudes towards youth, expectations, perceived roles, and perceived self-efficacy. Fifty-one participating programs with a total of 127 eligible participants were assigned to one of two blocks based on the length of their existing pre-match training. Twenty-five programs were randomly assigned to the treatment condition (n = 80 mentors) and 26 programs were assigned to a waitlist control group (n = 47 mentors). Programs randomized into the treatment group did not differ from those in the control group in terms of program size, age, target population, and adherence to the Elements of Effective Practice; however, treatment programs were more likely to be community-based.

    Mentors were between 16 and 68 years old, averaging 34.6 years old. About two-thirds reported that they were white (61.9 percent), about one-third were Black, (31.3 percent), 8.2 percent were Hispanic, and 6.7 percent identified with other racial groups. In terms of highest level of formal education, 30.4 percent of mentors received their high school diploma or GED, 13 percent received an associate degree or trade school certificate, 36.2 percent received their bachelor’s degree, and 20.3 percent completed a postbaccalaureate education. Treatment group members were significantly more likely to be male (28.4 percent) compared to the control group (10.2 percent), and they were significantly less likely to hold a four year degree (47.7 percent of the treatment group versus 64 percent of the waitlist control group). Treatment group volunteers received an average of 189.47 minutes of pre-match training covering an average of 3.57 topics from their mentoring program. There were no significant differences between the treatment and control groups on pre-match training exposure.

    All participants completed a series of web-based baseline surveys after enrollment. Waitlist control participants completed the same post-test surveys as well as a 50-item mentoring knowledge assessment an average of 21.22 days (SD = 14.10 days) after the pre-test. Treatment group participants took the mentoring knowledge assessment in three parts (10-20 questions each) at the end of each of the three online courses. They completed the rest of the post-test measures after completing all three courses, an average of 14.33 days (SD = 12.84 days) after study enrollment.

    Study outcomes were all based on mentor self-report. Unrealistically positive expectations and unrealistically negative expectations were assessed using a 12-item Mentor Expectations Questionnaire modified from Madia and Lutz (2004). Mentor preferences were assessed for 24 types of youth traits (such as youth who smoke cigarettes, or youth who are between the ages of 18 and 24) using a 4-point Likert scale of perceived difficulty ranging from 1 = not at all difficult to 4 = extremely difficult. Appropriate roles for mentors (for example, role model or adult friend), inappropriate roles for mentors (for example, parent, taxi driver, or pal/peer friend), and program specific roles (for example, tutor or community advocate) were measured using a 21-item questionnaire developed for this study on which participants indicated how often they expected to play certain roles (1 = never to 5 = all the time). Finally, mentor perceived self-efficacy was measured using a scale adapted from DuBois, Neville, Parra, and Pugh-Lilly (2002). This 26-item scale assessed volunteers’ self-perceived readiness to mentor youth on a 5-point scale ranging from 1 = not at all confident to 5 = extremely confident. Example items include readiness to “develop a close friendship with your mentee” and readiness to “provide your mentee with new experiences and opportunities that build upon his or her interests.”

    Regression Analyses controlling for pretest scores, gender, and educational attainment were used to test whether participation in the treatment group predicted each of the following outcomes: mentor knowledge, mentor preferences for specific types of youth, positive attitudes towards youth, unrealistically positive or unrealistically negative expectations, expectation of roles that are appropriate or inappropriate roles for mentors, and mentor perceived self-efficacy. Three other outcomes were assessed in the evaluation but are not included in this review: overinvolvement with children, self-enhancement, and social reciprocation.

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Mentoring Knowledge, Mentor Preferences, Positive Attitudes Towards Youth, Unrealistically Negative Expectations, Program Specific Roles
    Kupersmidt and Colleagues (2017) found that mentors randomly assigned to the treatment group did not significantly differ from those assigned to the control group on any of the above noted outcome measures.

    Unrealistically Positive Expectations, Inappropriate Roles for Mentors
    Kupersmidt and Colleagues (2017) found that mentors randomly assigned to the treatment group scored significantly lower than those assigned to the control group on each of the above noted outcomes.

    Appropriate Roles for Mentors, Mentor Perceived Self-Efficacy
    Kupersmidt and Colleagues (2017) found that mentors randomly assigned to the treatment group scored significantly higher than those assigned to the control group on each of the above noted outcomes.

    Additional Findings
    No significant differences were found between the treatment and control groups on the following additional outcomes: Overinvolvement with Children, Self-Enhancement, and Social Reciprocation. No subgroup analyses were tested.

    Evaluation Validity:

    Variations in the Resource
    No variations in this resource have been evaluated for effectiveness.

    Youth
    Data on youth were not reported in the single available study of this resource. Therefore, available findings do not provide an understanding of consistency and/or differences in the effectiveness of this resource based on characteristics of the youth being mentored.

    Mentors
    In the single available study of this resource, participating mentors were diverse in terms of age, race, and educational level; however, it did not test for possible differences in effectiveness in relation to mentor characteristics. Therefore, an understanding of the implications of this practice across mentors with varying characteristics and backgrounds is lacking.

    Program Settings/Structures
    The single available study of this resource was not conducted within a defined program setting or structure. The 51 programs from which mentors were recruited differed in terms of setting, program age, program size, target population, and use of benchmark practices from the Elements of Effective Practice; however, possible differences in effectiveness in relation to program characteristics were not tested. Therefore, an understanding of the implications of this practice across varying program settings and structures is lacking.

    Outcomes
    The single available study of this resource focused on mentor expectations, attitudes towards youth, motivations, knowledge, and self-efficacy as potential outcomes. Findings across these outcomes are variable, suggesting limited or moderate consistency of effects on the outcomes examined. This study does not report outcomes in the areas of mentoring relationships, program operations (e.g., costs of mentor training), or youth outcomes. Therefore, available findings do not provide a basis for understanding potential effects of this practice on outcomes in these areas.












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This online training program can be purchased online at the following links:

    Building the Foundation for Mentors: http://mentoringcentral.net/mentoring-training/building-the-foundation-mentor

    Ethics and Safety: http://mentoringcentral.net/mentoring-training/ethics-training

    Building and Maintaining the Relationship: http://mentoringcentral.net/mentoring-training/maintaining-the-relationship














  • References:

    DuBois, D. L., Neville, H. A., Parra, G. R., & Pugh-Lilly, A. O. (2002). Testing a new model of mentoring. In G. G. Noam (Ed.-in-chief) & J. E. Rhodes (Ed.), New directions for youth development: Theory, research, and practice: No. 93. A critical view of youth mentoring (pp. 21–57). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. https://doi.org/10.1002/yd.23320029305

    Madia, B. P., & Lutz, C. J. (2004). Perceived similarity, expectation‐reality discrepancies, and mentors' expressed intention to remain in Big Brothers/Big Sisters programs. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 34(3), 598-623. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-1816.2004.tb02562.x

























Preparing for Mentoring Program

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  • Description of Resource:

    This resource contains practical tips that mentoring programs can utilize to recruit and retain mentors.

    Note: This resource should not be viewed as a stand-alone or comprehensive resource on mentor recruitment and retention practices. For additional and complementary guidance, users of the resource are encouraged to consult the Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™, particularly recommendations for Recruitment, although those in other areas should be considered for relevance as well (e.g., mentor training as a retention strategy).

    Goals:

    To provide mentoring programs with strategies to recruit and retain mentors.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    Mentoring programs.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    Recruitment, Mentor Training

    Key Personnel:

    N/A

    Additional Information:

    This resource was created courtesy of the Texas Governor’s Mentoring Initiative.

  • Resource Name:

    Tips for Recruiting and Retaining Mentors

    Publisher/Source:

    MENTOR New York

    Authors:

    MENTOR New York

    Date of Publication:

    2015

    Resource Type:

    Program Management Resources








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online: https://www.mentoring.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/Recruitment.pdf

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























Tips for Recruiting and Retaining Mentors

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  • Description of Resource:

    This resource provides guidance and practical tools for how mentors can nurture and support a young person’s sense of purpose. The guide includes worksheets that mentors can use to reflect on their own sense of purpose and how that can influence the mentoring relationship including through communication strategies, adultism, and by giving space for youth voice.

    Note: Programs may wish to provide support for mentors in making use of this resource, as the content is fairly extensive and mentors may benefit from staff direction and input in how to make use of it most effectively. As noted in the resource, it should be kept in mind that a focus on supporting youth purpose may not be appropriate uniformly for all mentees (e.g., youth dealing with recent experiences of trauma or ongoing sources of stress or adversity as primary concerns).

    Goals:

    To provide mentors with guidance on ways they can support their mentees to explore purpose and find meaning, a sense of self, and ways of giving back to their world.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    Mentors and mentoring programs.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    Mentor Training, Match Support

    Key Personnel:

    N/A

    Additional Information:

    MENTOR has published an accompanying guide for staff implementation: The Mentor’s Guide to Youth Purpose: Staff Considerations for Using this Guide in Your Program.

    This publication was created with support from JPMorgan Chase & Co.

  • Resource Name:

    The Mentor's Guide to Youth Purpose

    Publisher/Source:

    MENTOR: The National Mentoring Partnership

    Author:

    Meghan Perry

    Date of Publication:

    2019

    Resource Type:

    Mentor Guides and Handouts








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online in PDF form, on the MENTOR website: https://www.mentoring.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/The-Mentors-Guide-to-Youth-Purpose.pdf

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























The Mentor's Guide to Youth Purpose

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  • Description of Resource:

    This resource provides guidance on how to start a mentoring program and highlights what is involved when starting a mentoring program. This resource includes considerations before starting and frequently asked questions to support those who are interested in starting a mentoring program.

    Note: This resource should not be viewed as a stand-alone or comprehensive resource on practices for starting a mentoring program. For additional and complementary guidance, users of the resource are encouraged to consult the Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™. The up-to-date version of the Quality Assurance Standards referred to in this resource are currently outlined as the Standards in the Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™.

    Goals:

    To provide individuals and organizations information and recommended practices on what is involved when launching a mentoring program.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    Programs interested in starting or enhancing a mentoring program.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    All

    Key Personnel:

    N/A

    Additional Information:

    N/A

  • Resource Name:

    Starting a Mentoring Program

    Publisher/Source:

    The EMT Group, Inc.

    Authors:

    Dustianne North, Jerry Sherk, and Judy Strother

    Date of Publication:

    1999

    Resource Type:

    Program Management Resources








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online: http://emt.org/userfiles/StartMentWeb.pdf

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























Starting a Mentoring Program

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  • Description of Resource:

    The STEM Mentoring Supplement to the Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ outlines recommendations and research-informed practices for STEM mentoring programs. This guide includes an overview of general program design principles for STEM mentoring programs using case studies as examples; standards of practice for STEM Mentoring programs with specific recommendations; and discussion of program evaluation and outcome measurement in STEM mentoring.

    Goals:

    To provide mentoring programs with research- and practitioner-informed standards and recommendations to help develop and enhance STEM mentoring programs.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    Mentoring programs.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    All

    Key Personnel:

    N/A

    Additional Information:

    The STEM Mentoring Supplement is part of MENTOR’s series of supplements to the cornerstone publication, Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™.

    This publication was sponsored by Genentech.

  • Resource Name:

    STEM Mentoring Supplement to the Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™

    Publisher/Source:

    MENTOR: The National Mentoring Partnership

    Authors:

    Dr. Janis Kupersmidt, Dr. Rebecca Stelter, Michael Garringer, Jennifer Bourgoin

    Date of Publication:

    2018

    Resource Type:

    Program Management Resources








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online: https://www.mentoring.org/stem-supplement-to-the-elements-of-effective-practice-for-mentoring

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























STEM Mentoring Supplement

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  • Description of Resource:

    The LGBTQ Supplement to the Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ outlines step-by-step operations guidance to developing safer, more affirming, and responsive mentoring relationships for LGBTQ youth. This resource contains specific recommendations for practices that are informed by the findings from a working group and the innovations of 20 Big Brothers Big Sisters of America Affiliates as well as by available research. The guide focuses on ways to improve program staff and participants’ awareness to serving the needs of LGBTQ youth; the need to prioritize safety and confidentiality in working with LGBTQ youth; and guidance on how to enhance program practices and capacity without stretching resources when considering the implementation of the recommendations.

    Goals:

    To provide mentoring programs with research- and practitioner-informed standards and recommendations to develop and support safer, affirming, and responsive mentoring relationships for LGBTQ youth.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    Mentoring programs.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    All

    Key Personnel:

    N/A

    Additional Information:

    The LGBTQ Supplement is part of MENTOR’s series of supplements to the cornerstone publication, Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™.

    This publication was supported by a grant from The Altria Group.

  • Resource Name:

    LGBTQ Supplement to the Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™

    Publisher/Source:

    MENTOR: The National Mentoring Partnership & Big Brothers Big Sisters of America

    Authors:

    Michael Garringer, Christian Rummell, Jennifer Bourgoin, Hillary Bardwell, Jessica Mitchell

    Date of Publication:

    January 2019

    Resource Type:

    Program Management Resources








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online: https://www.mentoring.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/MENTOR_LGBTQ-Supplement-to-EEP-for-Mentoring.pdf

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























LGBTQ Supplement

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  • Description of Resource:

    The Workplace Mentoring Supplement to the Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ outlines recommendations and research-informed practices for workplace mentoring programs. This resource includes case studies of workplace mentoring programs to illustrate how recommendations can be applied and implemented in the real-world.

    Goals:

    To provide mentoring programs with research- and practitioner-informed standards and recommendations to help develop and enhance workplace mentoring programs.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    Mentoring programs.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    All

    Key Personnel:

    N/A

    Additional Information:

    The Workplace Mentoring Supplement is part of MENTOR’s series of supplements to the cornerstone publication, Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™.

    This publication was sponsored by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

  • Resource Name:

    Workplace Mentoring Supplement to the Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™

    Publisher/Source:

    MENTOR

    Authors:

    Dr. Janis Kupersmidt, Dr. Rebecca Stelter, Michael Garringer, Justin Mayhew

    Date of Publication:

    October 2019

    Resource Type:

    Program Management Resources








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online: https://www.mentoring.org/workplace-mentoring-supplement-to-the-elements-of-effective-practice-for-mentoring

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























Workplace Mentoring Supplement

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  • Description of Resource:

    In response to the coronavirus pandemic, this resource provides four recommendations for mentors to help mentoring matches stay emotionally connected during this time of physical distance. The guidelines help prepare mentors on how to communicate with their mentees during this uncertain time, and provide ideas that may help facilitate and sustain the relationships, as well as the mentors’ engagement in the program itself.

    Please note: This resource is specific to Great Life Mentoring and its programming. To use it more broadly may require some modifications to the recommendations made in this resource.

    Goals:

    To provide mentors guidance on how to stay connected with their mentees during the coronavirus pandemic.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    Mentors and mentoring programs.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    Mentor training, Match support

    Key Personnel:

    N/A

    Additional Information:

    N/A

  • Resource Name:

    Isolation Without Loneliness: Staying Emotionally Connected in Times of Physical DistanceBuilding Relationships: A Guide for New Mentors

    Publisher/Source:

    Great Life Mentoring

    Author:

    Elizabeth Higley

    Date of Publication:

    March 2020

    Resource Type:

    Mentor Guides and Handouts








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online: https://greatlifementoring.com/staying-emotionally-connected-in-times-of-physical-distance

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























Isolation Without Loneliness: Staying Emotionally Connected in Times of Physical Distance

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  • Description of Resource:

    This toolkit contains resources for helping mentoring professionals with building programs to better serve youth in the foster care system. The four modules of the toolkit outline: 1) the research focused on how mentoring services and supports can support positive outcomes for youth in foster care, 2) the role of mentoring program staff and the importance of match support, 3) practices for training mentors who work with youth in foster care, and 4) suggestions for ways to create long-term relationships for young people in foster care.

    Please note: Some of the recommendations provided in this resource, such as for continuously available match support, may not be feasible or appropriate for all programs serving youth in the foster care system based on their available resources and other considerations.

    Goals:

    To equip mentoring programs with resources and skills to support youth in the foster care system.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    Mentoring program personnel and mentors.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    All

    Key Personnel:

    N/A

    Additional Information:

    Please note: Several embedded links in this resource are currently not updated.

  • Resource Name:

    Mentoring Youth in the Foster Care System Toolkit

    Publisher/Source:

    Youth Collaboratory

    Author:

    Dana Goodrow

    Date of Publication:

    2019

    Resource Type:

    Program Management Resources








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online: https://youthcollaboratory.org/toolkit/mentoring-youth-foster-care

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























Mentoring Youth in the Foster Care System Toolkit

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  • Description of Resource:

    This resource provides youth mentoring programs with suggestions on how to utilize social media to support mentors and mentees, recruit new volunteers, and market their program. Included in this resource are tips for using social networking to help with recruitment, tips for mentors on how to utilize social networking, and tips for mentoring programs to share with staff.

    Goals:

    To equip mentoring programs with practical tools and tips on how to utilize social networking to enhance their programming.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    Mentoring program staff.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    Recruitment, Training, Monitoring and Support

    Key Personnel:

    N/A

    Additional Information:

    N/A

  • Resource Name:

    Social Media and Mentoring

    Publisher/Source:

    Mentor Michigan

    Author:

    Mentor Michigan

    Date of Publication:

    N/A

    Resource Type:

    Program Management Resources








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online: https://www.michigan.gov/mentormichigan/0,4618,7-193-27047-252667--,00.html

    Please note: Some of the links included in this resource are not active and/or have not been updated. Users of this resource should be mindful of the rapidly changing landscape of social media platforms that go in and out of popularity. In addition, it is essential that programs have well-delineated and regularly updated policies on digital and social media use and that mentors, mentees and parents (as appropriate) are trained around programs’ relevant policies when it comes to digital and social media use.















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A

























Social Media and Mentoring

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