Displaying items by tag: Civic engagement

MARCH 7, 2017
BY: BERNADETTE SÁNCHEZ, PHD, NMRC RESEARCH BOARD MEMBER & PROFESSOR AT DEPAUL UNIVERSITY

Editor's Note: Several members of the NMRC Research Board participated in the 2017 National Mentoring Summit this past February, leading a research track that featured OJJDP-funded research and totaled 13 workshops across the multi-day event. We asked several Research Board members to share their key insights from the event based on a workshop they lead, an innovation they learned about, or a conversation they had with an attendee that made them think about the mentoring field in a new light. We will run several of these stories over the months of March and April in the NMRC blog to bring the Summit to life for those who could not attend.

Recent longitudinal studies show that Black adolescents and adults from low socioeconomic backgrounds who are resilient are also more likely to get physically sick. However, White adolescents and adults from similar backgrounds are immune to this negative outcome. For example, a study of Black, low-income adolescents revealed that those who were resilient (as demonstrated by high aspirations, unwavering persistence, investment in education, and avoidance of activities that sidetrack success) were also more likely to have type 2 diabetes as adults compared to Black adolescents who didn’t have these resilient traits. This trend didn’t emerge for White, low-income adolescents who were resilient. Other studies show similar patterns between White and Black participants. What explains these trends? Researchers speculate that Black, low-income resilient youth may feel enormous pressure to succeed, may feel socially isolated as they transition to new settings (e.g., college), and may encounter racism, which could ultimately leave them exhausted and neglect their physical health.

Published in NMRC Blog
Wednesday, 10 August 2016 10:51

Discussing Race and Injustice in Difficult Times

AUGUST 10, 2016
BY: ELIZABETH SANTIAGO, MENTOR: THE NATIONAL MENTORING PARTNERSHIP

All of us, but in particular our young people of color, have been plagued with feelings of anger, helplessness and despair in the face of national and local tragedies involving police violence against people of color. Paul O’Neal, Alton Sterling, Freddie Gray and others like them are in the media, and it’s difficult to find a voice to the confusion, sadness and rage that accompanies these highly visible and painfully corrosive incidents. Across the country, a movement to stop violence is inspiring a need for action and conversation. In order to support young people and ourselves as mentors, teachers, and community members, we need to begin real dialogue about these incidents and the underlying causes for them. We at MENTOR specifically have been asked if we have resources, guides, or other materials to help support mentors in sparking conversations about race and injustice. We have been working with our partners to coalesce as many materials and helpful guides as we can, but we know this is a complex topic that is often difficult for mentors to address with their mentees.

Published in NMRC Blog
MARCH 15, 2017
BY: ED BOWERS, PH.D, NMRC RESEARCH BOARD MEMBER, CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

Editor's Note: Several members of the NMRC Research Board participated in the 2017 National Mentoring Summit this past February, leading a research track that featured OJJDP-funded research and totaled 13 workshops across the multi-day event. We asked several Research Board members to share their key insights from the event based on a workshop they lead, an innovation they learned about, or a conversation they had with an attendee that made them think about the mentoring field in a new light. We will run several of these stories over the months of March and April in the NMRC blog to bring the Summit to life for those who could not attend.

A cross-cutting theme of the 2017 National Mentoring Summit was the role of law enforcement in the mentoring movement. Several workshop sessions provided exemplary programs and innovative ideas for engaging law enforcement in mentoring, and the closing plenary session focused on “Strengthening Community and Police Relations through Mentoring.” I think this emphasis is quite appropriate as law enforcement-based mentoring programs find themselves at a unique nexus in the fields of mentoring, career development, and community development, particularly in communities of color. Police are very aware of the needs of youth in their communities. They also recognize that they “cannot arrest their way out of the problem,” but need to take a different approach to build relationships with youth beyond legal encounters. Therefore, police-as-mentor programs are timely and well-positioned to benefit youth and communities in several ways.

Published in NMRC Blog
 
  • Description of Resource:

    This guide provides mentors with recommendations and resources to help them support youth who have faced experiences with violence or trauma. Topics addressed include helping youth process their emotions, ask for help, and channel uncertain feelings into positive action. The resource includes information on a mentor’s role in these conversations, how to communicate effectively about these topics, ways to provide support, and strategies for building facilitating group and community conversations about violence and trauma.

    Goals:

    To equip mentors with a framework for discussing violence and trauma with young people.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    N/A

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    Monitoring and Support

    Key Personnel:

    N/A

    Additional Information:

    MENTOR: The National Mentoring Partnership (MENTOR) developed this brief in collaboration with the Mental Health Association (MHA) of New York, with support from JPMorgan Chase as a part of its efforts to expand opportunities for young people through programs like The Fellowship Initiative (TFI).

  • Resource Name:

    Supporting Young People in the Wake of Violence and Trauma

    Publisher/Source:

    MENTOR: The National Mentoring Partnership, JPMorgan Chase, and the Mental Health Association (MHA) of New York

    Author:

    MENTOR: The National Mentoring Partnership

    Date of Publication:

    2017

    Resource Type:

    Mentor Guides and Handouts








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online in PDF form, on the MENTOR website: https://www.mentoring.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/JPMC-Trauma-Resource-2.pdf

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























Supporting Young People in the Wake of Violence and Trauma

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