Displaying items by tag: Implementation resource

DECEMBER 13, 2018
BY: MERLYNE PIERRE, PROGRAM MANAGER, MENTOR: THE NATIONAL MENTORING PARTNERSHIP

2018 in Review

As 2018 comes to a close, the NMRC team would like to thank this community of mentoring and youth development practitioners, researchers, advocates and others for your relentless work to support youth across America and equip them with relationships, skills, and experiences to achieve their goals. Now is a great time for us to think back on what we have accomplished, and start mapping out the groundwork for the work 2019 has in store.

For the OJJDP NMRC, 2018 has been an exciting year of spotlights on mentoring programs, research, and updates on existing tools and evidence reviews. The NMRC Research Board published an online module on Supporting and Inspiring Native Youth along with an evidence review on mentoring for youth with disabilities, look out for more content coming soon on mentoring for American Indian and Alaska Native youth. Additionally, program reviews were added, which provided insight on the Peraj Mentoring Program, don’t forget to read the Insights for Practitioners. Updates were made to practice reviews with additional secondary data analysis, such as Pre-Match Mentor Training and the Measurement Guidance Toolkit, which now includes 9 new measures of mentoring relationship quality for use in mentoring program evaluations. Supplementary Research Board-reviewed resources were added, including How to Build a Successful Mentoring Program Using the Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring, and we launched new podcast series, Reflections in Research.

Published in NMRC Blog
DECEMBER 11, 2018
BY: CAMILLE BRUGH AND AMANDA STEWART, BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS (BBBS) CENTRAL INDIANA

Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS) Central Indiana

BBBS Central IndianaMENTOR brings you a second blog post from our series of highlighting the work of grantees from the Mentoring Enhancement Demonstration Project (MEDP) funded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. This innovative project, which began in FY 2012, was intended to test whether mentoring programs could make enhancements to their usual services that strengthened mentors’ ability to serve as advocates and take on more of an explicit teaching role with their mentees. The hope was that this approach might strengthen mentor-mentee relationships and lead to stronger outcomes for youth.

Now that the evaluation of the project is coming to a close, we wanted to highlight the unique and innovative approaches to teaching and advocacy developed by several of the funded organizations. These posts highlight their excellent work and can illustrate for other mentoring programs how they might approach program improvements and participate in research projects in the future. The National Mentoring Resource Center thanks each grantee for their contributions to the project and for sharing their reflections with us here.

To capture the experience of Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS) Central Indiana, we decided to learn more about the project through an interview. Check out what they had to say below and feel free to leave a comment!

Published in NMRC Blog
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 11:55

Amachi Military Training

 
  • Description of Resource:

    This resource is a curriculum for mentors who will be working with youth in military families, often after a parent has been deployed. The curriculum consists of six “classroom” trainings intended to be delivered in-person and six additional webinars that can be offered at various points in the mentoring relationships as needed. The original version of this training also includes five e-learning modules that are currently available at: http://www.aemcfresourcecenter.com/

    See the “Accessing and Using This Resource” tab for additional information on the e-learning modules.

    The in-person trainings cover the following topics:

    • Boundary setting
    • Developmental phases of youth
    • Reintegration and family dynamics
    • Responding to sensitive issues
    • Self-care and compassion fatigue
    • Understanding resilience

    For each training, the facilitator is provided with a detailed session script, a set of slides and handouts, and multi-media clips that can be used to illustrate key points or stimulate discussion.

    In addition to the in-person classroom trainings, there is content for a series of supplemental webinars on additional topics relevant to mentors serving youth in military families:

    • Behavioral health
    • Crisis intervention
    • Dealing with grief and loss
    • Engaging parents and caregivers
    • Military family support
    • Suicide prevention and postvention

    Goals:

    This resource can prepare mentors for the unique challenges and opportunities of mentoring a child who has a deployed military parent or family member. Secondarily, these materials also are intended to be used to educate staff on how to serve military family youth more effectively.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    These materials are intended for use with mentors of youth from military families⎯ideal for programs serving a high percentage of youth from these families. This training may be particularly relevant when a youth has a deployed family member.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    Training
    Monitoring and Support

    Key Personnel:

    None required, although facilitators of the training will need some basic understanding of military terminology and culture.

    Additional Information:

    In addition to the training materials, practitioners can also download a research brief on the best practices of the Amachi Expansion for Military and Civilian Families program at: 
    http://www.issuelab.org/resource/taking_care_of_our_own_lesson_
    learned_about_engaging_military_families_in_youth_mentoring

  • Resource Name:

    Amachi Military Training

    Publisher/Source:

    Amachi, Inc.

    Author:

    Dare Mighty Things

    Date of Publication:

    2012

    Resource Type:

    Mentor Training Resources








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource has generously been made available by Amachi for free downloading from the NMRC using the links below.

    Training Overview:

    This document provides background information and framing for the delivery of all the training content.

    Classroom Trainings

    Webinars

    E-Learning Modules

    The e-learning modules are available at http://www.aemcfresourcecenter.com/ using the following log in:

    • User ID: aemcfmentor
    • password: mentor1

    Please note that the e-learning modules are no longer being supported or facilitated by an Amachi staff member, but they are available for mentors and program staff.

    If you have questions about the development or use of these materials, please contact Muna Walker at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..














  • References:

    None

























Amachi Military Training

Access this Resource

Click here to download a PDF of this Resource.

JULY 12, 2016
BY: GREG PICARD, HARVARD UNIVERSITY FELLOW, MENTOR: THE NATIONAL MENTORING PARTNERSHIP

OJJDP iGuidesThe Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) recently launched a new series of Model Programs Implementation Guides called “iGuides” to add to their already extensive set of program guides on juvenile justice, delinquency prevention, and child protection and safety. Their existing guides are a series of evidence-based how-to guides for youth programs to work towards these goals. They are currently narrowed down by topics such as “Child Protection, Health, and Welfare,” or “Delinquency Prevention,” etc. All of OJJDP’s Model Programs Guide information can be found here.

Published in NMRC Blog
 
  • Description of Resource:

    This “Best Practices” resource contains tips and recommendations for mentoring practitioners for enhancing cultural competence in their work with Native youth. It includes information about cultural norms and cross-cultural communication as well as tips for training and retaining mentors, with specific information about training non-Native mentors.

    Goals:

    To increase the cultural competence of mentoring practitioners and mentors for working with Native youth.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    Mentoring programs serving Native communities or youth.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    Training, Monitoring and Support, Closure

    Key Personnel:

    None.

    Additional Information:

    Please find additional information about Boys & Girls Clubs of America’s Native Services.

  • Resource Name:

    BGCA Best Practices: Mentoring Native Youth

    Publisher/Source:

    Boys & Girls Clubs of America

    Author:

    Boys & Girls Clubs of America

    Date of Publication:

    No date

    Resource Type:

    Program Management Resources








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource is available for free download in PDF format from the Boys & Girls Clubs Native Services website: http://www.naclubs.org. This resource is available in English.












  • References:

    None

























BGCA Best Practices: Mentoring Native Youth

Access this Resource

Click here to download a PDF of this Resource.

 
  • Description of Resource:

    Cross-age peer mentoring programs, in which older youth befriend and mentor younger children in a structured environment, are an increasingly popular choice for educators and youth development professionals hoping to create positive outcomes for youth. This guide provides recommendations for program design; participant recruitment, screening and selection; training; and match activities, as well as planning tools for program coordinators.

    Goals:

    To equip program coordinators with information to plan and implement effective cross-age peer mentoring programs for youth in schools.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    Peer mentoring programs in school settings.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    All

    Key Personnel:

    Mentoring Program Coordinators

    Additional Information:

    It is important to be aware that research indicates peer mentoring programs require supplemental supports in order to achieve effectiveness comparable to adult programs (Herrera et al., 2007). These supports may include, but are not necessarily limited to, enhanced forms of mentor screening and training as well as relatively more frequent and intensive ongoing supervision and problem-solving assistance for mentoring relationships once established. This Guide includes a number of recommendations for practices and safeguards of this nature. However, it should be noted that these generally have not been evaluated in research. Those considering implementation of a peer mentoring program are advised to consult the review of research on one-to-one cross-age peer mentoring that is available on this website.

    This publication was funded by the Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools at the U.S. Department of Education with EMT Associates, Inc.

  • Resource Name:

    Building Effective Peer Mentoring Programs in Schools: An Introductory Guide

    Publisher/Source:

    Mentoring Resource Center, Education Northwest

    Author:

    Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae

    Date of Publication:

    2008

    Resource Type:

    Program Management Resources








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online on Education Northwest’s website: https://educationnorthwest.org/sites/default/files/building-effective-peer-mentoring-programs-intro-guide.pdf

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























School-Based Peer Mentoring

Access this Resource

Click here to download a PDF of this Resource.

 
  • Description of Resource:

    This toolkit provides guidance on the design and development of mentoring programs that promote college and career success for youth. It contains recommendations on how to design a college and career mentoring (CCM) program by utilizing data, creating buy-in from stakeholders and building partnerships, and explains how these programs can select, prepare, and support mentors. It reviews ways to create communities of support for mentors and mentees, provides suggestions for programming related to college and career readiness, and lists additional resources, data tools, and program examples.

    Goals:

    To guide mentoring coordinators through the design and development of a college and career mentoring (CCM) program.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    Mentoring programs designed to promote college preparation activities. Although the resource references Indiana, its recommendations are applicable to other states.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    All

    Key Personnel:

    N/A

    Additional Information:

    This resource was produce in partnership by the Indiana Commission for Higher Education and the Indiana Youth Institute with support from the U.S. Department of Education.

    This resource does not necessarily include comprehensive consideration of the latest evidence-informed standards for effective practice in mentoring. Users of the resource are advised to consult the Elements of Effective Practice for MentoringTM, Fourth Edition and incorporate careful attention to these into any initiatives to provide mentoring in support of college and career success. Furthermore, given that the audience to whom this resource is directed is quite broad, users of this resource should confirm that the resources-based practices to be implemented are not identified as contraindicated or proscribed in the Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring for their specific population of mentors, mentees, program context or goals.

  • Resource Name:

    College and Career Success Mentoring Toolkit

    Publisher/Source:

    Indiana Commission for Higher Education and the Indiana Youth Institute

    Author:

    Not specified

    Date of Publication:

    Not specified

    Resource Type:

    Program Management Resources








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online in PDF form, at:
    http://s3.amazonaws.com/indiana-mentoring-partnership/files/CCM-Toolkit.pdf

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























College and Career Success Mentoring Toolkit

Access this Resource

Click here to download a PDF of this Resource.

 
  • Description of Resource:

    This guide contains 10 considerations for the design and delivery of quality mentoring programs for and with children, youth and families of Indigenous descent, including creating inclusive advisory groups, tips for recruitment and retention and screening of indigenous and non-indigenous mentors, and key understandings and terminology related to acknowledging identity and land. These considerations are based on research and the combined expertise Elders and Traditional Knowledge Keepers, as well as children, youth, mentors, educators, and other partners.

    Goals:

    To equip program coordinators with recommendations for the design and delivery of quality mentoring programs for and with children, youth and families of Indigenous descent.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    This guide is intended to support primarily non-Indigenous organizations that desire to develop and deliver quality mentoring programs for and with children, youth, and families of Indigenous descent.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    All

    Key Personnel:

    Mentoring Program Coordinators

    Additional Information:

    The guide provides an extensive list of organizations as well as community elders who provided guidance and insight into the recommendations found in the guide.

  • Resource Name:

    Considerations for Mentoring Indigenous Children and Youth

    Publisher/Source:

    Alberta Mentoring Partnership

    Author:

    Not specified

    Date of Publication:

    August 2017

    Resource Type:

    Program Management Resources








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online on Alberta Mentoring Partnership’s website: https://albertamentors.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Considerations-for-Mentoring-Indigenous-Children-and-Youth-Alberta-Mentoring-Partnership.pdf

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























Mentoring Indigenous Children

Access this Resource

Click here to download a PDF of this Resource.

Webinar Date: March 16, 2017

PANELISTS

  • Tommy McClam, YouthBuild USA
  • William Figueroa, Los Angeles Team Mentoring
  • Jerry Sherk, California Mentoring Partnership consultant

RESOURCES:

Paper Download the Presentation Slides
Paper Blank Group Mentoring Activity Development Matrix
Paper Group Mentoring Program Development Matrix
Paper Build a Company Group Mentoring Exercise
Paper Group Mentoring Development Manual
Paper Good News, Bad News: A Standard Sharing Exercise

Published in Webinars

Starting a Youth Mentoring Program

The Starting a Youth Mentoring Program e-learning experience was developed to provide new programs with the knowledge and tools to build a solid foundation for a quality mentoring program. Each of the ten sessions included reviews best practices for designing, launching, operating, and sustaining a quality youth mentoring program based on the Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ Fourth Edition. In combination with other resources available to you through the OJJDP National Mentoring Resource Center, these modules will support you in increasing your knowledge, learning the skills and building the infrastructure necessary to support positive youth outcomes through mentoring.

Click here to access the Starting a Youth Mentoring Program e-learning experience.

After viewing the ten sessions, if you are interested in accessing more support, click here to learn more about no-cost technical assistance available through the NMRC.

Published in Training & TA
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