Displaying items by tag: Interpersonal skills

National 4-H CouncilEstablished in 1914, 4-H is America’s largest youth development organization, with the mission of empowering nearly 6 million young people across the United States with the skills to lead for a lifetime. 4-H empowers individuals to be true leaders – young people who have confidence; know how to work well with others; endure through challenges; and stick to a job until it gets done.

4-H is delivered by Cooperative Extension – a community of 110 public, land grant universities that reach every county and parish across the country. Through in-school and afterschool programs, school and community clubs, and 4-H camps, 4-H provides experiences where young people learn by doing. Youth complete hands-on projects in areas like health, science, agriculture, and citizenship in a positive environment where they receive guidance from adult mentors and are encouraged to take on leadership roles.


Mentoring Model

Since 2010, in partnership with land grant universities and the Cooperative Extension System, the 4-H National Mentoring Program (4-H NMP) has incorporated positive youth development core principles to improve the well-being of youth 17 years old or younger and identified as at-risk or high risk for involvement in the juvenile justice system, especially underserved populations. The program engages youth in formal and informal one-on-one, group mentoring, and/or peer mentoring relationships tailored to the needs of the youth population. Mentoring services are targeted toward American Indian and Alaska Native youth both on and off reservations; children of parents on active military duty; children of incarcerated parents; LGBTQ+ youth; youth with disabilities; youth in rural communities; and other underserved youth who meet program requirements. In its seventh year of implementation, the 4-H NMP is currently in 40 states, 44 land-grant universities, 220 local sites, and is reaching more than 7,000 youth (62,000 youth cumulatively between 2010 and 2016).

Four Programs of Distinction (evidence-based, peer-reviewed programs reflecting the highest quality 4-H youth development programs) serve as the vehicle to help achieve a lasting mentoring relationship: 4-H Tech Wizards, 4-H Youth and Families with Promise (YFP), 4-H Living Interactive Family Education (LIFE), and 4-H Youth Futures. Each program incorporates the six core standards of the Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring. The 4-H Tech Wizards program, developed by Oregon State University, engages underserved youth in a group mentoring program that focuses on STEM education through mentoring and community service. 4-H YFP, developed from Utah State University, is a prevention program serving youth with below-average school performance, poor social skills and/or weak family bonds with one-on-one mentoring and family strengthening activities. The 4-H LIFE program, developed by the University of Missouri, uses parenting classes, 4-H club meetings, and group mentoring to strengthen parent/child bonds and develop leadership and decision-making skills in children with incarcerated parents or youth in the juvenile justice system. Finally, 4-H Youth Futures: College Within Reach, also developed by the University of Missouri, promotes college as an obtainable goal and provides mentoring services and instrumental support to under-represented, vulnerable and first-generation high-school youth.

The goal of the mentoring model is to provide high quality, consistent mentoring relationships with youth not traditionally reached by 4-H. These relationships are typically formed in the context of one of the four programs (as described above) that best fits the need of the youth, family, and community.

The 4-H National Mentoring Program is managed by a core team at National 4-H Council, however, programming is implemented through the land grant universities and approved local sites that meet the requirement to reach at-risk, high risk, and underserved youth across the United States. Mentors are recruited from within the local community in which the youth live. Examples include but are not limited to: community organizations, non-profits, high schools, colleges, and faith-based organizations. In some of 4-H’s Tribal programs, for example, mentors are often Tribal members, and programming is adapted to promote and respect Tribal customs.


The Importance of Local Partnerships

4-HBesides the focus on positive youth development, 4-H identifies its focus on developing meaningful local partnerships as a key ingredient for effective programming. These partnerships create buy-in from the community, meet a need for members and their families, and build the sustainability of a program that will be there long after traditional grant funding dries up. Many 4-H mentoring programs have created strong relationships with their local school systems, providing consistent academic support and a safe place for the youth to go and learn after school. As a result, inadvertent partnerships often form. In West Virginia, for example, a state-wide initiative is in place to provide specialized attention for youth who have been engaged by the police or had emergency services called to their home. The principal at a child’s school is informed of the occurrence, and due to the relationship with the local 4-H mentoring program, the principal reaches out to the youth’s mentor to alert him or her for intervention. Recently, a student was removed from their home and placed with guardians; the mentor was notified immediately and was a source of support during the difficult transition.

In Maine, a partnership with the local middle school has led to STEM classes and mentoring occurring as part of a weekly curriculum within the school. A local high school, concerned over difficulties with students as they transitioned from 8th to 9th grade, has partnered with a local Maine mentoring site to provide full-time academy-style, project-based learning for all 9th grade students. Students are bused to the program’s site and spend half the day there, receiving credits in science, math, language arts, social science, and physical education. Preliminary results have indicated a number of positive impacts for these youth, including increases in standardized tests for the local school.

In addition to providing well-rounded support and resources for youth, these partnerships have been used to increase the reach of the programs, and the mentoring programs have been utilized to leverage additional partnerships and funding sources.

4-H identifies its biggest accomplishment as the way program staff consistently strive to improve. The motto of 4-H – “to make the best better” – is a driver of 4-H’s programs. Staff and mentors continue to commit to reaching the most hard-to-reach youth, ensuring that the highest quality programming is made available to youth who need it the most.


Connections to Evidence-Based Practice

4-H measures success using outcome measures, including noted behaviors tracked by OJJDP. Those measures include perception of social support, social competence, and strength of family relationships. These measures are collected with the use of pre-test/post-test designed surveys. This process supports 4-H in improving the quality of its programs on a continuous basis.

4-H Tech Wizards, 4-H YFP, and 4-H LIFE are evidence-based programs that have been designated United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) Programs of Distinction. 4-H Programs of Distinction is a recognition program from USDA/NIFA that highlights high quality youth development programs within Cooperative Extension occurring in communities across the United States. Furthermore, the Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring are infused into the design and implementation of each program.

4-H continues to review the research on mentoring to ensure programming includes best practices to promote meaningful relationships, and positive youth development frameworks remain relevant to the organization’s work. The 4-H National Mentoring Program continues to view youth as assets and is motivated to enhance positive youth trajectories while reducing delinquency.


Next Steps 

The 4-H National Mentoring Program team plans to continue to look at empirical research to guide the direction of its mentoring efforts. Next steps will include a more intentional review of their data and more extensive analysis of sites that provide community-specific services, such as mentoring in tribal communities.

The 4-H National Mentoring Program encourages all of its local sites to reach out to the OJJDP NMRC for any technical assistance needs and consult its website often for information useful to program delivery. The 4-H National Mentoring Program plans to reach out to the NMRC to consult on possible evaluation methods as they continue forward with more intentional reviews of their impact.


Related Resources:

Published in Featured Grantees
 
  • Description of Resource:

    This guide for mentors provides an overview of basic skills and concepts that may contribute to effective mentoring relationships. After summarizing what makes a mentoring relationship successful, the guide reviews ten recommended principles of mentoring, from setting realistic goals and expectations, to giving mentees a voice and choice in deciding mentoring activities. The resource also includes questions for mentors to consider as they reflect on their mentoring relationships as well as handouts for mentors that introduce them to the mentoring relationship cycle and relationship stages.

    Goals:

    To equip mentors with an understanding of skills and principles that may contribute to successful mentoring relationships.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    This resource is relevant to all mentors, but contains some information that is specific to community-based mentors.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    Training, Monitoring and Support, Closure

    Key Personnel:

    N/A

    Additional Information:

    This resource was published by the Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence & the National Mentoring Center at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, with support from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, U.S. Department of Justice.

  • Resource Name:

    Building Relationships: A Guide for New Mentors

    Publisher/Source:

    The Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence & the National Mentoring Center at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory

    Author:

    Michael Garringer & Linda Jucovy

    Date of Publication:

    September 2007

    Resource Type:

    Mentor Guides and Handouts








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online in PDF form, at: http://educationnorthwest.org/sites/default/files/effective-strategies-for-providing-quality-youth-mentoring-in-schools2.pdf

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























Building Relationships Guide for New Mentors

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*Note: The National Mentoring Resource Center makes these “Insights for Mentoring Practitioners” available for each program or practice reviewed by the National Mentoring Resource Center Research Board. Their purpose is to give mentoring professionals additional information and understanding that can help them apply reviews to their own programs. You can read the full review of the After School Version or the full review of the Mentoring Version on the CrimeSolutions.gov website.


In considering the key takeaways from the research on this program (Challenging Horizons Program) that other mentoring programs can apply to their work, it’s useful to reflect on the features and practices that might have influenced its rating as “no effects” (that is, a program that has strong evidence that it did not achieve justice-related goals), as well as some of the more interesting aspects of the program design.

1) This program evaluation offers a great glimpse into “The Practitioner’s Dilemma”

In just about any program that tries to improve the lives of people there is always a tension (hopefully a healthy one) between what would be the optimal form of support and services that would have the most impact and the often disappointing reality of what is actually achievable in the real world given the available resources and the willing participation of those involved. The evaluation of the Challenging Horizons Program (CHP) in both its Afterschool (AS) and Mentoring (M) form offers a nice example of how programs can face challenges in offering implementing their theory of change in the most optimal way.

The reason that there are two versions of the program in the first place is that the developers of the program noted that implementations of the AS model had issues related to student attendance and overall attrition from the program. In their words, “staying after school 2 days a week for an entire school year is not desirable for many students”⎯to say nothing of the extracurricular obligations and transportation issues that may arise even for students who want to participate 2 days a week. Middle school students lead busy lives, so the Mentoring version of the program was developed to test whether a less-robust version offered during the school day could also lead to good outcomes, even if the developers themselves expected a reduced impact under the new format.

And why did they expect that reduced impact? (Which turns out to be exactly what their evaluation found…)

2) The differences in “dosage,” topics of emphasis, and delivery context really made a difference in how well these two models performed

The students served by the two versions of CHP were middle schoolers with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) who had already exhibited some challenges in school related to their condition. These youth differed from many of the typical students served by school-based mentoring programs in that they had a formal diagnosis of a condition that can really impact academic achievement and related aspects of life, like forming close relationships with peers and school staff. Overcoming the challenges presented by ADHD, specifically the difficulties related to keeping organized, completing assignments, managing time, and paying attention during instructional time, will understandably take a lot of concerted effort and time. These students literally needed to build a new set of skills, strategies, and mindsets related to schoolwork, and do this halfway through their time in the K12 system. So while the challenges were substantial, the two versions of the program approached it from pretty different perspectives, both in terms of design and execution:

  • The AS version offered students a full exposure to the curriculum of the program, targeting many different skills and strategies that students could learn and employ. The Mentoring version, however, usually whittled that down to one or two (80% of the participating youth got 2 or fewer pieces of the intervention).
  • The youth in the AS version of the program got significantly more time in the program working directly with a Personal Counselor who was trained in the intervention. In the Mentoring version, youth were paired with a teacher from the school with whom they had some kind of rapport, but spent less time with. Students in the AS version got an average of about 32 sessions of the course of the year, at 2 hours each. Students in the mentoring version got about 25. But the real difference was in the time spent: the Mentoring version meetings averaged a paltry 12 minutes in length. It’s hard to imagine many impacts coming from a mentoring relationship with an average of 12 minutes per conversation (although some interventions in the human services realm can be successful with a frequent-but-brief check-in format). In fact, mentors in the Mentoring version spent almost as much time meeting with their program consultants to discuss the intervention (262 minutes on average) as they did meeting with the recipients of the services (305 minutes on average)!
  • Additionally, one wonders if meeting with teachers who were already familiar to the mentees in the Mentoring version may have kept youth from feeling like this program was an exciting new thing. Mentees may have taken the program more seriously if they were matched with this new person from outside the school (as in the AS version) instead of having these short meetings with a teacher they already knew.
  • The Mentoring version also eliminated the group time that offered peer engagement and fun activities in the AS version. One can imagine that these peer group interactions could reinforce the messages and strategies of the intervention while also allowing for some fun and deeper engagement with staff.
  • And not surprisingly, the AS version also offered more chances for parents to learn about the program and reinforce the strategies of the program at home.

None of this is to say that CHP shouldn’t have tried the Mentoring version of the program. But the reality is that the AS version was rated as having an 85% fidelity to the intervention (meaning youth got 85% of what they were supposed to) as opposed to the 80% for the mentoring version. So in spite of the fact that the AS version was seen as more onerous for youth to participate in, those students actually got more total intervention, delivered more completely, in spite of those challenges. What this means for practitioners is that they should consider trying different versions of an intervention and test them to see what the optimal delivery might look like, as was done here. The study authors ultimately conclude that the best version of this model is something that builds in the full curriculum and dosage, but does it during the school day to alleviate the scheduling challenges for families. So in the battle of ideal vs realistic, the best path forward is trial and error and tweaking until a program gets it right.

3) A “training” intervention might be particularly appropriate for ADHD youth

The authors of the study of CHP really emphasize that an intervention focused on training ADHD youth in new strategies, techniques, and skills to help offset the impact of their condition on learning. These training interventions differ from behavior management interventions that often try to achieve the same goals by incentivizing certain behaviors rather than approaching them as a new skill to learn and develop. But, the authors note, “our results suggest that making long-term changes in adolescents’ behavior using training interventions may take considerable time and coached practice”⎯something that the AS version of the program barely provided and the Mentoring version didn’t offer at all, really. In fact, one wonders what a multi-year version of CHP might be able to achieve, especially if it was able to offer a special “mentoring” relationship with a teacher in the building over multiple years to keep reinforcing the lessons of the curriculum and offering ongoing coaching over time. So if your program wants to improve outcomes for ADHD youth, plan on it being something that takes considerable time and effort. Which is what those youth may need and certainly deserve from the caring adults around them.


For more information on research-informed program practices and tools for implementation, be sure to consult the Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ and the "Resources for Mentoring Programs" section of the National Mentoring Resource Center site.

Evidence Rating: No Effects - One study

Date: This profile was posted on November 07, 2016


Program Summary

This is an after-school intervention designed to help students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) develop, practice, and generalize academic and social skills by using volunteer mentors to deliver skills training to students. This program is rated as No Effects. Academic functioning and parent/teacher ratings of student behavior reflecting ADHD symptoms did not differ significantly between youths in the intervention group and those in the control group.

You can read the full review on CrimeSolutions.gov.

Evidence Rating: No Effects - One study 

Date: This profile was posted on November 07, 2016


Program Summary

This is a school-based intervention designed to help students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) develop, practice, and generalize academic and social skills by using volunteer mentors to deliver skills training to students. This program is rated as No Effects. Academic functioning and parent/teacher ratings of student behavior reflecting ADHD symptoms did not differ significantly for youths in the intervention group, compared with the control group.

You can read the full review on CrimeSolutions.gov.

Wednesday, 07 January 2015 12:40

Finding Mentors, Finding Success

 
  • Description of Resource:

    This resource is intended to support high school-age youth with finding his or her next mentor at the end of a programmatic mentoring relationship. Originally designed for use in YouthBuild programs, this resource is designed to help youth think about where they are at in life, what they liked from their previous mentoring relationships, and how future mentors could offer new forms of support and guidance. Planning worksheets and other prompts encourage the mentee to think about the help he or she will need in meeting goals, while tips on making “the ask” attempt to take some of the fear and awkwardness out of approaching someone and asking that person to take on a mentoring role.

    Goals:

    Provide young people with the information and skills needed to find new mentors throughout their lives, especially when one mentoring relationship may be ending.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    Although designed for youth exiting a formal mentoring program, much of the content can be applied to youth in general.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    Recruitment
    Closure

    Key Personnel:

    None.

    Additional Information:

    None.

  • Resource Name:

    Finding Mentors, Finding Success: A guide to finding—and engaging—supportive adults throughout your life

    Publisher/Source:

    YouthBuild USA

    Author:

    YouthBuild USA

    Date of Publication:

    2013

    Resource Type:

    Resources for Mentees and Families








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource is available for free download from the YouthBuild USA National Mentoring Alliance website at: http://youthbuildmentoringalliance.org/webfm_send/723 












  • References:

    None

























"Finding

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Girls Inc.With local roots dating to 1864 and national status as a non-profit organization in the U.S. since 1945, Girls Inc. seeks to inspire all girls to be strong, smart, and bold through direct service and advocacy. The Girls Inc. movement started in New England during the Industrial Revolution as a response to the needs of a new working class: young women who had migrated from rural communities in search of newly available job opportunities in textile mills and factories. Formerly known as Girls Clubs of America, Girls Inc. equips girls with the skills they need to navigate economic, gender, and social barriers and grow up healthy, educated, and independent. Girls Inc. makes this transformational change through the Girls Inc. Experience: the people, environment and programming that, together, empower girls to succeed. Trained staff and volunteers build lasting mentoring relationships in girls-only spaces that are physically and emotionally safe and where girls find a sisterhood of support with shared drive, mutual respect, and high expectations. Hands-on, research-based programs provide girls with the skills and knowledge to set goals, overcome obstacles, and improve academic performance. Informed by girls and their families, Girls Inc. also works with policymakers to advocate for legislation and initiatives that increase opportunities for girls.

Girls Inc. strives to serve the girls who need them most, particularly girls from low-income communities and girls of color. Through a network of 83 local Girls Inc. nonprofit organizations, Girls Inc. serves 156,263 girls ages 5 - 18 annually in 32 states and provinces across the United States and Canada. Seventy percent of Girls Inc. girls identify as girls of color, including 39% who identify as African-American/ Black, 24% as Latina/ Hispanic, and 7% as Multicultural. 62% of girls served live in households earning $30,000 or less a year. One in ten come from households earning $10,000 or less a year.


The Bold Futures Mentoring Program

Girls Inc.Building on 30 years of mentoring experience and success supporting at-risk girls, Girls Inc. provides the Girls Inc. Bold Futures Mentoring program launched with a $2 million, two-year grant award through the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention’s Mentoring Opportunities for Youth Initiative in 2016 and expanded through a second grant of $1.5 million in 2017

Girls Inc. offers weekly small group mentoring programs, with a ratio of one staff person for every four girls, at 20 Girls Inc. locations in high-need communities across 15 states. Each year of the program, Girls Inc. will serve approximately 1,000 girls ages 9 to 14, providing consistent, in-depth experiences designed to strengthen girls’ coping skills, reduce risk factors, minimize entry/re-entry into the juvenile justice system, and increase family engagement.

The Bold Futures Mentoring program participants include: Girls Inc. of Carpinteria (CA); Girls Inc. of Central Alabama (AL); Girls Inc. of Greater Philadelphia & Southern New Jersey (PA/NJ); Girls Inc. of Holyoke (MA); Girls Inc. of Jacksonville (FL); Girls Inc. of Kingsport (TN); Girls Inc. of Los Angeles (CA); Girls Inc. of Lynn (MA); Girls Inc. of Memphis (TN); Girls Inc. of Metropolitan Dallas (TX); Girls Inc. of Metro Denver (CO); Girls Inc. of New Hampshire; Girls Inc. of Oak Ridge (TN); Girls Inc. of Omaha (NE); Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest (OR/WA); Girls Inc. of San Antonio (TX); Girls Inc. of Santa Fe (NM) Girls Inc. of Tarrant County (TX); Girls Inc. of Washington County (MD); and Girls Inc. of Worcester (MA).

Program GoalsGirls Inc.

Today, girls throughout the country continue to face real and profound challenges. One in six girls will not finish high school. One in four girls experiences sexual abuse or assault by age 17. And the United States continues to have the highest teen pregnancy rate in the developed world. We also know girls in the U.S. are uniquely affected by poverty. Girls in high-risk communities face stunning exposure to violence, victimization, and sexual assault. Without adequate support, victims too often become offenders – girls may respond to trauma and violence with behaviors that result in their involvement in the juvenile justice system. In response to the need, Girls Inc. is expanding its capacity to help more girls cope with violence and trauma in their world through the Bold Futures Mentoring program.

The goal of the mentoring model is to combine the impact of Girls Inc. programming (each girl receives 52 hours of research-based gender specific Girls Inc. programming), delivered by trained facilitators, with a small group mentoring approach (each girl receives 48 hours of mentoring) to help girls develop the skills and confidence they need to feel safe in their world. Mentors are trained and prepared to support and reinforce the topics addressed in programming, giving girls the opportunity to speak to the mentor and their peers about issues raised during programming, unanswered questions, or requests for more information.

Mentors & Staff

Girls Inc. staff are extensively trained in both program-specific implementation and general facilitation skills, including education about girls’ developmental behaviors that helps them understand and manage groups of girls effectively and with insight. Girls Inc. mentors are recruited locally, thoroughly screened and trained prior to engaging with girls, are largely female, and include college students as well as community volunteers.

Promoting Safety & Preventing Violence through Developmentally Appropriate Education

Girls Inc. believes that girls have the right to be confident in themselves and safe in the world, so their commitment is that every girl in the Bold Futures program participate in a minimum of 12 hours of Girls Inc. Project BOLD – a gender specific violence prevention program that is research-based and age appropriate.

Through Girls Inc. Project BOLD, girls learn skills and strategies to lead safer lives in their homes, in relationships, in their communities, and online. Girls learn specific self-defense techniques and strategies as well as how to seek out and talk to caring adults about personal and gender-based violence. For girls in the BOLD Futures age range, Action for Safety℠ (for girls ages 9-11) builds negotiation, assertiveness, and self-defense skills as well as facilitating open and honest discussions about violence—including teasing and bullying, sexual harassment, dating violence, and physical and sexual abuse—to encourage and support girls who are being hurt and to lessen their fear and sense of isolation. Living Safe and Strong℠ (for girls ages 12-14) continues discussion of gender violence issues, reinforces and provides additional safety strategies and self-defense skills for teen girls, and introduces them to community experts and resources. Girls also develop and conduct community action projects addressing violence issues that are important to them.

Mentors are invited to participate in the program as well, positioning them to understand and further address in their small groups the issues that may arise from taking on the complicated topics related to violence, harassment and abuse.

Program Outcomes

Girls Inc.Through Bold Futures, Girls Inc. aims to equip girls with the guidance, support and skills to be engaged in school, build healthy relationships with peers and family, and reduce negative and high-risk behaviors. Long-term, Bold Futures will become a model program implemented across the larger Girls Inc. network and will be shared with peer organizations to strengthen juvenile justice prevention efforts nationwide.

Specific outcomes for girls in Bold Futures are measured through a retrospective survey process, asking them to identify changes in their behaviors and attitudes following participation in the program, inclusive of a wide range of elements, from school attendance, to standing up for themselves, to substance and tobacco use, to involvement with the justice system. Early data shows that girls who complete the program are meeting the projected target percentages for the vast majority of the outcomes measures.

Beyond outcomes measures, anecdotal evidence of the positive impact of the program on girls abounds. One mentee commented that, “I now know how to protect myself against those bullies at school” (Girls Inc. of New Hampshire). Finally, a significant achievement in the early stages of Bold Futures is the development of a cadre of trained mentors who are willing to dedicate their time to the girls, even beyond the program’s duration. Girls Inc. mentors, who vary by affiliate from college interns to community volunteers, have almost unilaterally taken to heart their role in contributing to a girl’s potential and encouraging her to develop the confidence, resilience, and strength of character that will help her become a healthy, educated and independent young woman.


Connections to Research

Girls Inc. programming is informed by research about the unique experiences of girls, and the specific experiences they face in the juvenile justice system. For example, a history of abuse, violence, or sexual assault is disproportionately prevalent among justice-involved girls. These girls are twice as likely as justice-involved boys to have gone through five or more “adverse childhood experiences” and four times as likely to have experienced sexual assault (Saar, Page, Epstein, Rosenthal, & Vafa, 2015; Shufelt & Cocozza, 2006). Girls are predominantly arrested for nonviolent status offenses such as truancy and running away (U.S. Department of Justice, 2015), which are common responses to violence, bullying or harassment at school, and abuse or conflict at home (Saar et al., 2015).

Girls Inc. also knows that exposure to trauma before high school is a stronger predictor of girls’ delinquency than is an experience of trauma during high school (Marsiglio, Chronister, Gibson, & Leve, 2014). Many girls ages 9 to 14 already carry a burden of trauma, navigating a changing landscape of risks at home, at school, and in their community. More than one-third of juvenile victims of serious violence, and nearly half (47%) of juvenile sexual assault victims, are under the age of 12. Among juvenile victims of violence, 75% of girls are victims of sexual assault, compared to 25% of boys. At school, girls face real risk of sexual assault. Unlike other violent crimes against juveniles, sexual assaults peak during school hours (Sickmund & Puzzanchera, 2014). Girls also face dangers at home: from age 11 on, girls are 35% more likely than boys to be verbally, physically, emotionally, or sexually abused (U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, 2016).

With these facts at the forefront, Girls Inc. designed Bold Futures to help girls develop the personal and self defense skills they need to feel safe, and to provide them the support of mentors and caring adults who will reinforce and support them, at the ages and developmental stages where these resources are most relevant.


Next Steps 

Girls Inc. is currently exploring ways to strengthen its programming, while sharing its expertise about gender specific mentoring with other organizations. The organization is currently making adjustments to the duration of the program and creating a flexible model allowing Girls Inc. affiliates to customize their recruitment goals to the needs of the communities they serve. They are also working on providing mentor training opportunities specific to working with girls in small groups in a Girls Inc. environment. Program staff regularly utilize resources from MENTOR and the OJJDP National Mentoring Resource Center, while research staff participate in webinars and consultation from MENTOR about research-to-practice applications and program assessment.

In 2018, Girls Inc. shared insights from its programming at the National Mentoring Summit.


Related Resources


References

Marsiglio, Mary C.; Chronister, Krista M.; Gibson, Brandon; & Leve, Leslie D. (2014). Examining the link between traumatic events and delinquency among juvenile delinquent girls: A longitudinal study. Journal of Child & Adolescent Trauma 7(4), 217-225.

Saar, Malika Saada; Epstein, Rebecca; Rosenthal, Linsday; & Vafa, Yasmin (2015). The Sexual Abuse to Prison Pipeline: The Girls’ Story. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Law Center, Center for Poverty and Inequality.

Shufelt, Jennie L., and Joseph. J. Cocozza (2006). Youth with Mental Health Disorders in the Juvenile Justice System: Results from a Multistate Prevalence Study. Research and Program Brief, 1–6. Delmar, N.Y.: National Center for Mental Health and Juvenile Justice.

Sickmund, Melissa; & Puzzanchera, Charles (2014). Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 2014 National Report. Pittsburgh: National Center for Juvenile Justice.

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Children’s Bureau. (2016). Child maltreatment 2014.

U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (2015). Policy Guidance: Girls and the Juvenile Justice System.

Published in Featured Grantees
Tuesday, 09 October 2018 13:11

High School Teen Mentoring Handbook

 
  • Description of Resource:

    This mentor handbook reviews key information and skills for mentors of high school students, including roles and responsibilities, the mentoring relationship life cycle, conversation and listening skills, supporting mentees’ self-esteem, addressing child safety concerns, and understanding mentees’ learning styles.

    Goals:

    To equip mentors with the skills to build strong mentoring relationships with high school students.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    Mentors of high school students

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    Training, Monitoring and Support

    Key Personnel:

    Mentors

    Additional Information:

    The High School Teen Mentoring Handbook is the result of a four year pilot program by Advanced Education and Technology in partnership with Big Brother Big Sister of Edmonton and Area, and supported by Alberta Education.

  • Resource Name:

    High School Teen Mentoring Handbook

    Publisher/Source:

    Government of Alberta, Advanced Education and Technology

    Author:

    Not specified

    Date of Publication:

    2010

    Resource Type:

    Mentor Guides and Handouts








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online on the Government of Alberta’s website: https://alis.alberta.ca/media/1599/mentorhandbook.pdf

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























HighSchoolTeenMentoringHandbook.png

Access this Resource

Click here to download a PDF of this Resource.

 
  • Description of Resource:

    In response to the coronavirus pandemic, this resource provides four recommendations for mentors to help mentoring matches stay emotionally connected during this time of physical distance. The guidelines help prepare mentors on how to communicate with their mentees during this uncertain time, and provide ideas that may help facilitate and sustain the relationships, as well as the mentors’ engagement in the program itself.

    Please note: This resource is specific to Great Life Mentoring and its programming. To use it more broadly may require some modifications to the recommendations made in this resource.

    Goals:

    To provide mentors guidance on how to stay connected with their mentees during the coronavirus pandemic.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    Mentors and mentoring programs.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    Mentor training, Match support

    Key Personnel:

    N/A

    Additional Information:

    N/A

  • Resource Name:

    Isolation Without Loneliness: Staying Emotionally Connected in Times of Physical DistanceBuilding Relationships: A Guide for New Mentors

    Publisher/Source:

    Great Life Mentoring

    Author:

    Elizabeth Higley

    Date of Publication:

    March 2020

    Resource Type:

    Mentor Guides and Handouts








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online: https://greatlifementoring.com/staying-emotionally-connected-in-times-of-physical-distance

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























Isolation Without Loneliness: Staying Emotionally Connected in Times of Physical Distance

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Click here to view this Resource.

JANUARY 11, 2017
BY: DELIA HAGAN, MENTOR: THE NATIONAL MENTORING PARTNERSHIP
National Mentoring Month: Tools to Help You Celebrate and Activate Your Community

How does your mentoring program recognize National Mentoring Month? For those of us who are less familiar, National Mentoring Month is a national campaign that raises awareness about the need for mentors, as well as how each of us can work together to increase the number of mentors to help ensure positive outcomes for our young people. This campaign also celebrates mentoring and the positive effect it can have on young lives, and it’s a great time for mentoring programs to recognize the power of mentoring relationships, celebrate the work of exceptional mentors, spread awareness about the impact of your work and show members of your community how they can get involved.

Published in NMRC Blog
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