Displaying items by tag: Mentoring relationship quality

SEPTEMBER 17, 2018
BY: BOBBI JO ORTIZ, LCSW, CEO & ANNETTE BAUMANN, BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS (BBBS) EL PASO

Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS) El Paso

This blog post is part of a brief series MENTOR has put together highlighting the work of grantees of Mentoring Enhancement Demonstration Project (MEDP) funded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. This innovative project, which began in FY 2012, was intended to test whether mentoring programs could make enhancements to their usual services that strengthened mentors’ ability to serve as advocates and take on more of an explicit teaching role with their mentees. The hope was that this approach might strengthen mentor-mentee relationships and lead to stronger outcomes for youth.

Now that the evaluation of the project is coming to a close, we wanted to highlight the unique and innovative approaches to teaching and advocacy developed by several of the funded organizations. These posts highlight their excellent work and can illustrate for other mentoring programs how they might approach program improvements and participate in research projects in the future. The National Mentoring Resource Center thanks each grantee for their contributions to the project and for sharing their reflections with us here.

Below is one of many more blog posts to come detailing MEDP grantees wonderful contributions to the mentoring field.

Published in NMRC Blog
MARCH 14, 2018
BY: SIERRA FRANCIS, PROJECT COORDINATOR, YOUTH DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS, FIRSTPIC, INC.

NMRC Represented at Boys & Girls Clubs of America's 2017 Native SummitThis past November, the Boys & Girls Clubs of America’s (BGCA) 2017 Native Summit held in Fort Myers, Florida was host to a variety of informational sessions, workshops, exhibitors, and cultural exchanges aimed towards Club professionals working with Native youth. After 25 years in Native Lands, BGCA is the nation’s largest youth service provider for Native youth, with a network of nearly 200 Boys & Girls Clubs that serve over 86,000 youth from 100 different American Indian, Alaska Native, American Samoan and Hawaiian Tribal communities.

Due to the unique conditions of working in Native communities, topics for workshops were carefully considered for their relevancy and impact. Topics offered ranged from lifestyle trends with Native youth, best practices for Club programming, and ideas for integrating culture into the Club. Of these, integrating culture generated some of the highest levels of interest from Club staff members, who are especially cognizant of the role culture and identity play in the lives of their youth. Facilitated by BGCA Native Services Director of Organizational Development Anna Bear, the session had a panel of three Boys & Girls Club executive directors present to speak on this very important topic. Executive Directors included Ron Corn of the Woodland Boys & Girls Club in Neopit, Wisconsin, Tamara Little Salt of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale in Scottsdale, Arizona, and Nathan Hale of the Boys & Girls Club of the Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation in Mayetta, Kansas.

Published in NMRC Blog
MAY 22, 2018
BY: DANA GOODROW, MANY

National Foster Care Awareness Month Blog Series (Part 1 of 5)

Mentoring is essentially about relationships. More than meeting program goals or benchmarks, the real benefit of mentoring comes from the relationship built between the youth and the mentor over time. It is this relationship that fosters positive youth development, skill-building, and personal growth that are the touchstones of the mentoring model. Benefits of having a mentor include improved academic outcomes, increased relationship skills, enhanced self-esteem and self-confidence, improved behavior and interpersonal skills, and a reduction in risky behaviors such as drug and alcohol use. If the mentor-mentee relationship can have that much power, imagine how powerful it can be for someone who may not have typical family or community supports in their life.

Young people involved in the foster care system often are faced with limited opportunities to connect with supportive adults. This is in part due to the fact that many foster youth are subjected to multiple, short-term placements, and that they are often separated from immediate and extended family systems. Research indicates that experiences within the foster care system affect all kinds of relationships, including those with parents and caregivers, siblings, and others involved in their day-to-day lives.

Published in NMRC Blog
 
  • Description of Resource:

    Cross-age peer mentoring programs, in which older youth befriend and mentor younger children in a structured environment, are an increasingly popular choice for educators and youth development professionals hoping to create positive outcomes for youth. This guide provides recommendations for program design; participant recruitment, screening and selection; training; and match activities, as well as planning tools for program coordinators.

    Goals:

    To equip program coordinators with information to plan and implement effective cross-age peer mentoring programs for youth in schools.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    Peer mentoring programs in school settings.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    All

    Key Personnel:

    Mentoring Program Coordinators

    Additional Information:

    It is important to be aware that research indicates peer mentoring programs require supplemental supports in order to achieve effectiveness comparable to adult programs (Herrera et al., 2007). These supports may include, but are not necessarily limited to, enhanced forms of mentor screening and training as well as relatively more frequent and intensive ongoing supervision and problem-solving assistance for mentoring relationships once established. This Guide includes a number of recommendations for practices and safeguards of this nature. However, it should be noted that these generally have not been evaluated in research. Those considering implementation of a peer mentoring program are advised to consult the review of research on one-to-one cross-age peer mentoring that is available on this website.

    This publication was funded by the Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools at the U.S. Department of Education with EMT Associates, Inc.

  • Resource Name:

    Building Effective Peer Mentoring Programs in Schools: An Introductory Guide

    Publisher/Source:

    Mentoring Resource Center, Education Northwest

    Author:

    Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae

    Date of Publication:

    2008

    Resource Type:

    Program Management Resources








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online on Education Northwest’s website: https://educationnorthwest.org/sites/default/files/building-effective-peer-mentoring-programs-intro-guide.pdf

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























School-Based Peer Mentoring

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Click here to download a PDF of this Resource.

 
  • Description of Resource:

    This guide for mentors provides an overview of basic skills and concepts that may contribute to effective mentoring relationships. After summarizing what makes a mentoring relationship successful, the guide reviews ten recommended principles of mentoring, from setting realistic goals and expectations, to giving mentees a voice and choice in deciding mentoring activities. The resource also includes questions for mentors to consider as they reflect on their mentoring relationships as well as handouts for mentors that introduce them to the mentoring relationship cycle and relationship stages.

    Goals:

    To equip mentors with an understanding of skills and principles that may contribute to successful mentoring relationships.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    This resource is relevant to all mentors, but contains some information that is specific to community-based mentors.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    Training, Monitoring and Support, Closure

    Key Personnel:

    N/A

    Additional Information:

    This resource was published by the Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence & the National Mentoring Center at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, with support from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, U.S. Department of Justice.

  • Resource Name:

    Building Relationships: A Guide for New Mentors

    Publisher/Source:

    The Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence & the National Mentoring Center at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory

    Author:

    Michael Garringer & Linda Jucovy

    Date of Publication:

    September 2007

    Resource Type:

    Mentor Guides and Handouts








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online in PDF form, at: http://educationnorthwest.org/sites/default/files/effective-strategies-for-providing-quality-youth-mentoring-in-schools2.pdf

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























Building Relationships Guide for New Mentors

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Click here to download a PDF of this Resource.

 
  • Description of Resource:

    This guide contains 10 considerations for the design and delivery of quality mentoring programs for and with children, youth and families of Indigenous descent, including creating inclusive advisory groups, tips for recruitment and retention and screening of indigenous and non-indigenous mentors, and key understandings and terminology related to acknowledging identity and land. These considerations are based on research and the combined expertise Elders and Traditional Knowledge Keepers, as well as children, youth, mentors, educators, and other partners.

    Goals:

    To equip program coordinators with recommendations for the design and delivery of quality mentoring programs for and with children, youth and families of Indigenous descent.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    This guide is intended to support primarily non-Indigenous organizations that desire to develop and deliver quality mentoring programs for and with children, youth, and families of Indigenous descent.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    All

    Key Personnel:

    Mentoring Program Coordinators

    Additional Information:

    The guide provides an extensive list of organizations as well as community elders who provided guidance and insight into the recommendations found in the guide.

  • Resource Name:

    Considerations for Mentoring Indigenous Children and Youth

    Publisher/Source:

    Alberta Mentoring Partnership

    Author:

    Not specified

    Date of Publication:

    August 2017

    Resource Type:

    Program Management Resources








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online on Alberta Mentoring Partnership’s website: https://albertamentors.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Considerations-for-Mentoring-Indigenous-Children-and-Youth-Alberta-Mentoring-Partnership.pdf

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























Mentoring Indigenous Children

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Click here to download a PDF of this Resource.

JULY 26, 2017
BY: KEVIN JONES, PH.D.

Welcome back, ethics enthusiasts! Mentoring maniacs! Problem-solving pros!

I am delighted you have returned for Round 3 in this series on ethical decision-making in youth mentoring programs. In the off chance that you missed the near-viral(ish) first and second posts, you can find them here and here.

Post #1 introduced an innovative framework for mentoring professionals, programs, volunteers, and others to address challenging ethical dilemmas in practice. The second installment tackled a real-life reader-submitted ethical dilemma that I analyzed and discussed using the framework as a guide.

So what’s behind door #3?

Published in NMRC Blog
Tuesday, 09 October 2018 13:11

High School Teen Mentoring Handbook

 
  • Description of Resource:

    This mentor handbook reviews key information and skills for mentors of high school students, including roles and responsibilities, the mentoring relationship life cycle, conversation and listening skills, supporting mentees’ self-esteem, addressing child safety concerns, and understanding mentees’ learning styles.

    Goals:

    To equip mentors with the skills to build strong mentoring relationships with high school students.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    Mentors of high school students

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    Training, Monitoring and Support

    Key Personnel:

    Mentors

    Additional Information:

    The High School Teen Mentoring Handbook is the result of a four year pilot program by Advanced Education and Technology in partnership with Big Brother Big Sister of Edmonton and Area, and supported by Alberta Education.

  • Resource Name:

    High School Teen Mentoring Handbook

    Publisher/Source:

    Government of Alberta, Advanced Education and Technology

    Author:

    Not specified

    Date of Publication:

    2010

    Resource Type:

    Mentor Guides and Handouts








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online on the Government of Alberta’s website: https://alis.alberta.ca/media/1599/mentorhandbook.pdf

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























HighSchoolTeenMentoringHandbook.png

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Click here to download a PDF of this Resource.

APRIL 13, 2018
BY: BRIAN SALES, DIRECTOR OF TRAINING AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE, MENTOR: THE NATIONAL MENTORING PARTNERSHIP

Culturally Responsive MentoringDuring my work in the formal mentoring field and youth development, I have surprisingly seen little research incorporating culturally responsive frameworks for mentoring youth of color. Seemingly, much of the mentoring research continues to remain void of references that illustrate the unique and historical coping strategies symbolizing the strength and resilience of people of color, Black people in particular. Since the largest number of identified youth in MENTOR’s: Examining Youth Services Across America report reports over 75% of the children and youth served are youth of color and 30% are African-American, my observation is even more distressing. 

Whether working in small cities or culturally diverse suburbs, I also noticed programmatic approaches that were often “deficit based” and “culturally irrelevant” to the communities being served. Instead of identifying, incorporating, and celebrating the individualized coping skills and community-based adaptations developed by African American communities, many of these approaches were over-focused on prevention and intervention. As a result, I found refuge in reviewing and utilizing the practice-based curriculum about the African-centered rites of passage from experts, e.g. Paul Hill, Dr. Nsenga Warfield-Coppock and a dissertation by Dr. Keith Alford.

Published in NMRC Blog
Webinar Date: April 20, 2018

FACILITATOR

  • Michael Garringer – MENTOR: The National Mentoring Partnership

PANELISTS

  • Michael Karcher – UT-San Antonio
  • Sam McQuillin – University of South Carolina
  • Nancy Deutsch – University of Virginia

RESOURCES:

Paper Download the Presentation Slides

Published in Webinars
Page 1 of 5

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