Displaying items by tag: Relationship development

An Interview with Dr. Barbara McKeon

JULY 26, 2016
BY: GREGORY PICARD, HARVARD UNIVERSITY FELLOW, MENTOR: THE NATIONAL MENTORING PARTNERSHIP

Champions

Broome Street Academy in New York, NY is not your typical high school. As Head of School, Dr. Barbara McKeon shares that the school’s mission is to “serve children who are homeless, in foster care, or have been involved in the welfare system.” The vast majority of Broome Street Academy’s student body comes from economically disadvantaged backgrounds and faces significant life barriers that can be linked to negative life outcomes. What makes Broome Street Academy so special is that over eighty percent of the students who attend this charter high school go to college, a surprising figure considering these factors.

Published in NMRC Blog
SEPTEMBER 17, 2018
BY: BOBBI JO ORTIZ, LCSW, CEO & ANNETTE BAUMANN, BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS (BBBS) EL PASO

Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS) El Paso

This blog post is part of a brief series MENTOR has put together highlighting the work of grantees of Mentoring Enhancement Demonstration Project (MEDP) funded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. This innovative project, which began in FY 2012, was intended to test whether mentoring programs could make enhancements to their usual services that strengthened mentors’ ability to serve as advocates and take on more of an explicit teaching role with their mentees. The hope was that this approach might strengthen mentor-mentee relationships and lead to stronger outcomes for youth.

Now that the evaluation of the project is coming to a close, we wanted to highlight the unique and innovative approaches to teaching and advocacy developed by several of the funded organizations. These posts highlight their excellent work and can illustrate for other mentoring programs how they might approach program improvements and participate in research projects in the future. The National Mentoring Resource Center thanks each grantee for their contributions to the project and for sharing their reflections with us here.

Below is one of many more blog posts to come detailing MEDP grantees wonderful contributions to the mentoring field.

Published in NMRC Blog
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 11:55

Amachi Military Training

 
  • Description of Resource:

    This resource is a curriculum for mentors who will be working with youth in military families, often after a parent has been deployed. The curriculum consists of six “classroom” trainings intended to be delivered in-person and six additional webinars that can be offered at various points in the mentoring relationships as needed. The original version of this training also includes five e-learning modules that are currently available at: http://www.aemcfresourcecenter.com/

    See the “Accessing and Using This Resource” tab for additional information on the e-learning modules.

    The in-person trainings cover the following topics:

    • Boundary setting
    • Developmental phases of youth
    • Reintegration and family dynamics
    • Responding to sensitive issues
    • Self-care and compassion fatigue
    • Understanding resilience

    For each training, the facilitator is provided with a detailed session script, a set of slides and handouts, and multi-media clips that can be used to illustrate key points or stimulate discussion.

    In addition to the in-person classroom trainings, there is content for a series of supplemental webinars on additional topics relevant to mentors serving youth in military families:

    • Behavioral health
    • Crisis intervention
    • Dealing with grief and loss
    • Engaging parents and caregivers
    • Military family support
    • Suicide prevention and postvention

    Goals:

    This resource can prepare mentors for the unique challenges and opportunities of mentoring a child who has a deployed military parent or family member. Secondarily, these materials also are intended to be used to educate staff on how to serve military family youth more effectively.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    These materials are intended for use with mentors of youth from military families⎯ideal for programs serving a high percentage of youth from these families. This training may be particularly relevant when a youth has a deployed family member.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    Training
    Monitoring and Support

    Key Personnel:

    None required, although facilitators of the training will need some basic understanding of military terminology and culture.

    Additional Information:

    In addition to the training materials, practitioners can also download a research brief on the best practices of the Amachi Expansion for Military and Civilian Families program at: 
    http://www.issuelab.org/resource/taking_care_of_our_own_lesson_
    learned_about_engaging_military_families_in_youth_mentoring

  • Resource Name:

    Amachi Military Training

    Publisher/Source:

    Amachi, Inc.

    Author:

    Dare Mighty Things

    Date of Publication:

    2012

    Resource Type:

    Mentor Training Resources








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource has generously been made available by Amachi for free downloading from the NMRC using the links below.

    Training Overview:

    This document provides background information and framing for the delivery of all the training content.

    Classroom Trainings

    Webinars

    E-Learning Modules

    The e-learning modules are available at http://www.aemcfresourcecenter.com/ using the following log in:

    • User ID: aemcfmentor
    • password: mentor1

    Please note that the e-learning modules are no longer being supported or facilitated by an Amachi staff member, but they are available for mentors and program staff.

    If you have questions about the development or use of these materials, please contact Muna Walker at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..














  • References:

    None

























Amachi Military Training

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Friday, 15 March 2019 11:50

Art Heals! How ART + MENTORS = RESILIENCE

MARCH 15, 2019
BY: JESSICA FLOWERS, PROGRAM DIRECTOR, FREE ARTS FOR ABUSED CHILDREN OF ARIZONA

Art Heals!

Karen pulls up to the suburban four-bedroom home in West Phoenix, opens her trunk and pulls out two green canvas bags that read “Free Arts” on the side. She looks up and notices a small face pressed against the glass in the front window. The front door swings open and a staff member from the foster care group home unlocks the screen from the inside, letting Karen into the house. Immediately, two grade school aged girls run up and ask, “What are we making today, Miss Karen?” “You’ll see!” Karen replies with a twinkle in her eye. “Want to help me set out the supplies?” The girls agree and set to work. Soon, five other girls trickle into the kitchen area, some with wet hair fresh from the shower, others already in their pajamas. They gather around the large dining table, picking up supplies and asking excited questions, “Are these for us?” “What are these?” “Ooo, shiny!” one exclaims about some stickers fresh from the package. “I’m new here, who are you?” one asks.

Published in NMRC Blog
OCTOBER 23, 2017
BY: CLAIRE DORN, PROGRAM DIRECTOR, ASPIRA INC. OF ILLINOIS

ASPIRA Inc.ASPIRA Inc. of Illinois is a Puerto Rican non-profit organization committed to the self-determination of Latino and other underserved youth through educational opportunity, leadership development, and cultural awareness.

In the City of Chicago, many young people of color lack the support and funding that create pathways toward opportunity. ASPIRA mentors play a crucial role by stepping up in their communities to support Latino teens in establishing and achieving personal, academic, and professional goals. Mentors join the ASPIRA Mentoring Program for various reasons. Some want to build positive connections with a younger generation and empower youth to develop as leaders, while others are eager to support first generation youth through their shared identities and experiences. Although mentors come from diverse professional and cultural backgrounds, they are trained to provide meaningful insight and support during critical times in the mentees’ lives.

Published in NMRC Blog
MAY 22, 2018
BY: DANA GOODROW, MANY

National Foster Care Awareness Month Blog Series (Part 1 of 5)

Mentoring is essentially about relationships. More than meeting program goals or benchmarks, the real benefit of mentoring comes from the relationship built between the youth and the mentor over time. It is this relationship that fosters positive youth development, skill-building, and personal growth that are the touchstones of the mentoring model. Benefits of having a mentor include improved academic outcomes, increased relationship skills, enhanced self-esteem and self-confidence, improved behavior and interpersonal skills, and a reduction in risky behaviors such as drug and alcohol use. If the mentor-mentee relationship can have that much power, imagine how powerful it can be for someone who may not have typical family or community supports in their life.

Young people involved in the foster care system often are faced with limited opportunities to connect with supportive adults. This is in part due to the fact that many foster youth are subjected to multiple, short-term placements, and that they are often separated from immediate and extended family systems. Research indicates that experiences within the foster care system affect all kinds of relationships, including those with parents and caregivers, siblings, and others involved in their day-to-day lives.

Published in NMRC Blog
 
  • Description of Resource:

    Cross-age peer mentoring programs, in which older youth befriend and mentor younger children in a structured environment, are an increasingly popular choice for educators and youth development professionals hoping to create positive outcomes for youth. This guide provides recommendations for program design; participant recruitment, screening and selection; training; and match activities, as well as planning tools for program coordinators.

    Goals:

    To equip program coordinators with information to plan and implement effective cross-age peer mentoring programs for youth in schools.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    Peer mentoring programs in school settings.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    All

    Key Personnel:

    Mentoring Program Coordinators

    Additional Information:

    It is important to be aware that research indicates peer mentoring programs require supplemental supports in order to achieve effectiveness comparable to adult programs (Herrera et al., 2007). These supports may include, but are not necessarily limited to, enhanced forms of mentor screening and training as well as relatively more frequent and intensive ongoing supervision and problem-solving assistance for mentoring relationships once established. This Guide includes a number of recommendations for practices and safeguards of this nature. However, it should be noted that these generally have not been evaluated in research. Those considering implementation of a peer mentoring program are advised to consult the review of research on one-to-one cross-age peer mentoring that is available on this website.

    This publication was funded by the Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools at the U.S. Department of Education with EMT Associates, Inc.

  • Resource Name:

    Building Effective Peer Mentoring Programs in Schools: An Introductory Guide

    Publisher/Source:

    Mentoring Resource Center, Education Northwest

    Author:

    Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae

    Date of Publication:

    2008

    Resource Type:

    Program Management Resources








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online on Education Northwest’s website: https://educationnorthwest.org/sites/default/files/building-effective-peer-mentoring-programs-intro-guide.pdf

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























School-Based Peer Mentoring

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Click here to download a PDF of this Resource.

 
  • Description of Resource:

    This guide for mentors provides an overview of basic skills and concepts that may contribute to effective mentoring relationships. After summarizing what makes a mentoring relationship successful, the guide reviews ten recommended principles of mentoring, from setting realistic goals and expectations, to giving mentees a voice and choice in deciding mentoring activities. The resource also includes questions for mentors to consider as they reflect on their mentoring relationships as well as handouts for mentors that introduce them to the mentoring relationship cycle and relationship stages.

    Goals:

    To equip mentors with an understanding of skills and principles that may contribute to successful mentoring relationships.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    This resource is relevant to all mentors, but contains some information that is specific to community-based mentors.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    Training, Monitoring and Support, Closure

    Key Personnel:

    N/A

    Additional Information:

    This resource was published by the Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence & the National Mentoring Center at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, with support from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, U.S. Department of Justice.

  • Resource Name:

    Building Relationships: A Guide for New Mentors

    Publisher/Source:

    The Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence & the National Mentoring Center at Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory

    Author:

    Michael Garringer & Linda Jucovy

    Date of Publication:

    September 2007

    Resource Type:

    Mentor Guides and Handouts








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online in PDF form, at: http://educationnorthwest.org/sites/default/files/effective-strategies-for-providing-quality-youth-mentoring-in-schools2.pdf

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























Building Relationships Guide for New Mentors

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Click here to download a PDF of this Resource.

SEPTEMBER 14, 2018
BY: MELANIE ERVIN, DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATION, ADOPT A CLASS

Adopt a Class ModelAdopt A Class, a Unique Approach to Group Mentoring

Hi Friends, It’s Melanie Ervin, Director of Communication of Adopt A Class. I am here to share our work and 3 lessons we’ve learned that has sustained our program year over year.

But first, What is Adopt A Class?

Adopt A Class (AAC) is group mentoring program in Greater Cincinnati that connects businesses and civic groups to students in high poverty schools. Serving students Pre-K through 8th grade for more than 15 years, the AAC program positively impacts the students AND businesses involved. Today, Adopt A Class serves over 6000 students with the help of over 2500 mentors, representing 150 organizations.

Published in NMRC Blog
 
  • Description of Resource:

    This guide contains 10 considerations for the design and delivery of quality mentoring programs for and with children, youth and families of Indigenous descent, including creating inclusive advisory groups, tips for recruitment and retention and screening of indigenous and non-indigenous mentors, and key understandings and terminology related to acknowledging identity and land. These considerations are based on research and the combined expertise Elders and Traditional Knowledge Keepers, as well as children, youth, mentors, educators, and other partners.

    Goals:

    To equip program coordinators with recommendations for the design and delivery of quality mentoring programs for and with children, youth and families of Indigenous descent.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    This guide is intended to support primarily non-Indigenous organizations that desire to develop and deliver quality mentoring programs for and with children, youth, and families of Indigenous descent.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    All

    Key Personnel:

    Mentoring Program Coordinators

    Additional Information:

    The guide provides an extensive list of organizations as well as community elders who provided guidance and insight into the recommendations found in the guide.

  • Resource Name:

    Considerations for Mentoring Indigenous Children and Youth

    Publisher/Source:

    Alberta Mentoring Partnership

    Author:

    Not specified

    Date of Publication:

    August 2017

    Resource Type:

    Program Management Resources








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online on Alberta Mentoring Partnership’s website: https://albertamentors.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Considerations-for-Mentoring-Indigenous-Children-and-Youth-Alberta-Mentoring-Partnership.pdf

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























Mentoring Indigenous Children

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Click here to download a PDF of this Resource.

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