Displaying items by tag: Relationship development

OCTOBER 13, 2017
BY: BRIAN SALES, DIRECTOR OF TRAINING AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE, MENTOR: THE NATIONAL MENTORING PARTNERSHIP

“When people are threatened in a racial moment, they are overwhelmed and unable to access their own abilities, their own competencies and are unable to access the very things we think of what involves teaching and policing our society.”

This past August, I had the very good fortune of attending a three-day Racial Empower Collaborative (REC) workshop led by Dr. Howard C. Stevenson the Constance Clayton Professor of Urban Education, Professor of Africana Studies, at the University of Pennsylvania.

Stevenson is the author of several books including, Promoting Racial Literacy in Schools: Difference That Makes a Difference; and PLAAY: Preventing Long-Term Anger and Aggression in Youth. His research publications and clinical work involve developing culturally relevant "in-the-moment" strengths-based measures and therapeutic interventions that teach emotional and racial literacy skills to families and youth. Dr. Stevenson was joined by two of his post-doctoral students, Kelsey Jones, Ph.D. and Jason Javier-Watson, Ed.D. co-led the training. There were ten participants, mostly K-12 educators primarily from the Philadelphia area and others from New Jersey and New England including two licensed social workers from New Orleans, LA.

Published in NMRC Blog
APRIL 15, 2016
BY: DELIA GORMAN, PROGRAM MANAGER, MENTOR: THE NATIONAL MENTORING PARTNERSHIP

An Interview with Camille Stone, Program Director of the Remote Tutoring and Mentoring Program at We Teach Science

What if the right technology could make mentoring programs safer? What if it could help us better support our mentors, while preparing young people for a brighter future?

As a part of our monthly Collaborative Mentoring Webinar Series, MENTOR facilitated a webinar this February called “Mentoring in the Age of Technology”, which explored the impacts of technology on youth mentoring, and featured seasoned mentoring practitioners who use technology as a mentoring tool.

 We Teach Science 
Published in NMRC Blog
Monday, 13 March 2017 16:12

Experience Corps Mentor Toolkit

 
  • Description of Resource:

    This handbook, created by AARP Foundation’s Experience Corps program, walks Experience Corps mentors through their role as a tutor and mentor, and reviews skills and activities they can do with their mentees to support their academic and life success. The handbook explores how Experience Corps mentors can strive to promote youth reading, test scores, and literacy while also making a difference in their well-being, relationships and decision-making skills. With definitions, worksheets, activity ideas, and reflection questions, this handbook is intended to support mentors in transforming their tutoring sessions into a space that also offers support for the long-term social and emotional well-being of students. Much of this resource is grounded in social-emotional learning and growth concepts, and it ties these to the skills mentors can employ to support them.

    Goals:

    To support mentors in promoting youth academic achievement and social-emotional learning through tutoring and mentoring sessions.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    This resource is geared toward mentors who support students in the context of tutoring sessions.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    Training, Monitoring and Support

    Key Personnel:

    None

    Additional Information:

    N/A

  • Resource Name:

    Experience Corps Mentor Toolkit

    Publisher/Source:

    AARP Foundation Experience Corps

    Author:

    Christian Rummell, Ed.D., Senior Researcher, American Institutes for Research

    Date of Publication:

    June 2015

    Resource Type:

    Mentor Guides and Handouts








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    Click here to download a PDF of this Resource.















  • References:

    None

























Experience Corps

Access this Resource

Click here to download a PDF of this Resource.

Webinar Date: August 15, 2019

FACILITATOR

  • Dustianne North, PhD, MSW, Research Director/TA Provider, California Mentoring Partnership

PANELISTS

  • Carissa Phelps, JD/MBA, Esq., CEO & Founder, Runaway Girl, Inc.
  • Skye O’Neal Adrian, LGBTQ Policy Consultant, Youth Collaboratory: Youth Catalyst Team
  • Kendan Elliott, Technical Assistant Manager, Youth Collaboratory

RESOURCES:

Paper Download the Presentation Slides
Paper Human Trafficking Into and Within the United States: A Review of the Literature
Paper Youth Involvement in the Sex Trade: A National Study
Paper From Exploitation to Industry: Definitions, Risks, and Consequences of Domestic Sexual Exploitation and Sex Work Among Women and Girls
Paper Shining Light on the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children A Toolkit to Build Understanding
Paper Mentoring for Youth with Backgrounds of Involvement in Commercial Sex Activity

Published in Webinars
Monday, 30 September 2019 14:13

Fostering Healthy Futures

SEPTEMBER 30, 2019
BY: HEATHER TAUSSIG, PHD, AND LINDSEY WEILER, PHD, NMRC RESEARCH BOARD MEMBERS

Fostering Healthy Futures

We recently published a paper replicating findings from previous research on the mental health impacts of the Fostering Healthy Futures (FHF) program (Taussig, Weiler, Garrido, Rhodes, Boat & Fadell, 2019). The study was a randomized controlled trial with 426 children who were randomly assigned to either FHF or the control condition. Below are a few important takeaways from this research.

Briefly, FHF is a mentoring and skills group program for preadolescent youth (ages 9-11) who have experienced maltreatment and been placed in foster care. The mentors are graduate students in social work and psychology who receive course credit for their mentoring. Each graduate student mentors two children in one-to-one matches over the course of 30 weeks (across the academic year). They also provide transportation for their mentees to and from a weekly skills group.

Published in NMRC Blog
 
  • Description of Resource:

    This guidebook focuses on the many aspects of program design and management that may have an impact on match length. It offers advice for specific practices that can help create and support longer matches, as well as tools and templates for program use.

    Goals:

    This resource is intended to help programs create long-lasting mentoring relationships by recruiting appropriate participants and training, matching, and supporting them intentionally.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    None.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    Recruitment
    Screening
    Training
    Matching
    Monitoring and Support

    Key Personnel:

    None.

    Additional Information:

    This resource was developed under the Student Mentoring Program initiative, which was a jointly funded project of the U.S. Department of Education and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

  • Resource Name:

    Going the Distance: A Guide to Building Lasting Relationships in Mentoring Programs

    Publisher/Source:

    Mentoring Resource Center (a joint project of EMT and Education Northwest)

    Author:

    Dr. Susan Weinberger (Mentor Consulting Group) with Michael Garringer and Patti MacRae (Education Northwest)

    Date of Publication:

    2005

    Resource Type:

    Program Management Resources








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource is free to download in PDF format on the Education Northwest website at:
    http://educationnorthwest.org/sites/default/files/resources/
    going_the_distance.pdf












  • References:

    None

























Going the Distance

Access this Resource

Click here to download a PDF of this Resource.

Tuesday, 09 October 2018 13:11

High School Teen Mentoring Handbook

 
  • Description of Resource:

    This mentor handbook reviews key information and skills for mentors of high school students, including roles and responsibilities, the mentoring relationship life cycle, conversation and listening skills, supporting mentees’ self-esteem, addressing child safety concerns, and understanding mentees’ learning styles.

    Goals:

    To equip mentors with the skills to build strong mentoring relationships with high school students.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    Mentors of high school students

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    Training, Monitoring and Support

    Key Personnel:

    Mentors

    Additional Information:

    The High School Teen Mentoring Handbook is the result of a four year pilot program by Advanced Education and Technology in partnership with Big Brother Big Sister of Edmonton and Area, and supported by Alberta Education.

  • Resource Name:

    High School Teen Mentoring Handbook

    Publisher/Source:

    Government of Alberta, Advanced Education and Technology

    Author:

    Not specified

    Date of Publication:

    2010

    Resource Type:

    Mentor Guides and Handouts








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online on the Government of Alberta’s website: https://alis.alberta.ca/media/1599/mentorhandbook.pdf

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























HighSchoolTeenMentoringHandbook.png

Access this Resource

Click here to download a PDF of this Resource.

Webinar Date: November 15, 2018

PANELISTS

  • Daniel Horgan, The Mentoring Partnership of Southwestern Pennsylvania
  • Deborah Anglin, Hearts to Nourish Hope
  • Corey Manning, YouthBuild USA, Inc.
  • Gregory Meves, Marriott Foundation

RESOURCES:

Paper Download the Presentation Slides

Published in Webinars
Webinar Date: April 20, 2018

FACILITATOR

  • Michael Garringer – MENTOR: The National Mentoring Partnership

PANELISTS

  • Michael Karcher – UT-San Antonio
  • Sam McQuillin – University of South Carolina
  • Nancy Deutsch – University of Virginia

RESOURCES:

Paper Download the Presentation Slides

Published in Webinars

KLFKnoxville Leadership Foundation (KLF) is a 501(c)(3), faith-based, nonprofit organization formed in 1994 to serve a nine-county East Tennessee area. KLF’s mission is to engage organizations and individuals to collectively serve those in need—those who are vulnerable due to lack of education, employment, or resources necessary to overcome challenges. Since 2004, KLF has operated Amachi Knoxville, a mentoring program with documented success and a passionate response to the needs of children with one or both parents in prison. KLF is a member of Leadership Foundations, an international network of over 45 affiliates working to renew the most economically distressed areas in cities across the world.


A Collaborative Approach to Mentoring

KAMIThe Knoxville Area Mentoring Initiative (KAMI) is a collaborative mentoring project built on the resources of some of the strongest mentoring organizations in East Tennessee. KAMI is led by Knoxville Leadership Foundation (KLF) through their program Amachi Knoxville and with partners Big Brothers Big Sisters of East Tennessee (BBBS), Joy of Music School (JOMS), Girls on the Run of Greater Knoxville (GOTR) and the YMCA. The collective mentoring activities focus on various topics such as sports, nature, technology, building up self-esteem, the performing arts and traditional community-based mentor activities. It is because of this variety in programmatic activity that these partnering organizations knew a collaborative mentoring model would show the collective impact of their efforts.

One of the goals of the collaborative is to leverage the combined resources of its member programs to increase the number of mentoring relationships in the region, while increasing the efficiency, consistency and quality of staff and mentor trainings. But this approach also provides great benefits for the youth served across the member programs. Because of the collaborative, KAMI staff have the ability to recommend the program that best aligns with each mentee’s specific interests, such as sports or the arts, to ensure the most successful match possible. Additionally, KAMI has increased pro-social support for mentees, provided more opportunities for the mentees to engage in community activities, and created a broader mentoring network in the region.

Program Goals

The primary goals of the initiative are to highlight the importance of mentoring, to bring awareness to the collaborating organizations, support new mentor growth, as well as improve social support networks among participating mentees. KAMI works together to strengthen the existing mentoring activities of each partnering organization to improve behavior, attitudes, and outcomes for at-risk youth by connecting them with trained mentors in 12 East Tennessee counties, constituting a mix of urban and rural communities.

Building the Framework for a Successful Mentoring Collaborative

KAMI In order to build a framework that would help KAMI succeed as a mentoring collaborative, trust between the partners would have to be established. KLF established a KAMI advisory committee with leaders from each partnering organization and began meeting every two weeks. This provided each committee member with the opportunity to learn more about each other and their respective mentoring programs. The committee looked for similarities between the organizations in order to give them a starting point for future activities. Then, using components of the Elements of Effective Practice for MentoringTM  they began to build their model.

Through this focus on the Elements, they developed a mentor recruitment plan and for the first time in Knoxville, a mentor could go to one website (http://www.knoxmentoring.org) to learn about mentoring options. Through the website, potential mentors are able to complete an interest form that helps to identify mentoring options available based on their interests. The committee identified minimum standards for a mentor that all collaborative organizations would endorse. They also put forth pre-match standards to provide an adequate education for each organization’s mentors. As they collectively worked on each of these enhancements, trust began to deepen, collaborative trainings and events were held, and knowledge and resources were shared to help collaborative members better navigate any issues with mentors and mentees.

KLF’s staff manage and oversee the KAMI collaborative. The collaborative team is made up of highly capable and experienced staff with expertise in specific areas, contributing to a highly functioning team. Each of the other four partner organizations assign staff to KAMI to ensure the partnership is functioning effectively and efficiently. Additionally, each partner has supporting staff that ensure the uniqueness of their organization is held intact while achieving both their individual organizations’ goals and the goals of KAMI. KLF has found that in a collaboration, clearly defined roles and responsibilities of each partner creates a healthy and functioning team.

Program Outcomes

KAMIBy joining forces and working together, KAMI has strengthened the mentoring presence in East Tennessee and the surrounding area. Collectively, KAMI has matched 1,432 at-risk children with a caring adult mentor and hosted 9 family fun days in just eighteen months. The collective knowledge of mentoring partners has allowed them to be more effective and bolder in their efforts to create and foster mentoring opportunities. Mentees have gained a broader vision of the cultural activities available in their community, from theater to sports. Mentors have increased knowledge of the issues that youth face and how they can make an impact. East Tennessee now has a collective relational support system of five organizations that can offer guidance to youth and their mentors, equipping them to face challenges and build strong relationships. Lastly, the collaborative has helped its member programs focus on their collective mission of creating a healthy community where East Tennessee youth can thrive.


Connections to Evidence-Based Practice

KAMI has experienced program success through their use of evidence-based best practices outlined in the Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring TM (the Elements). KAMI staff received technical assistance (TA) from OJJDP’s National Mentoring Resource Center (NMRC) to facilitate trainings on the Elements. These trainings focused on recruitment and match support, as well as training on overcoming unconscious bias and addressing racial bias in mentoring relationships. This kicked off several months of ongoing training for staff, mentors, and caregivers with a focus on trauma-informed care, suicide prevention, domestic abuse, and the opioid epidemic. Efforts were also made to ensure that trainings helped adults understand the specific experiences, interests and contexts of the program’s youth, like discussions on what music mentees are listening to.

The KAMI Advisory Board, as well as site coordinators, traveled to Washington D.C. for the 2018 National Mentoring Summit convened by MENTOR: The National Mentoring Partnership. The Summit provided the collaborative with the opportunity to learn and engage in recent research-based and evidence-based mentoring elements. It also served as a time for KAMI partners to bond and build better relationships, and promote collaboration among members.


Next Steps

KAMI

Through this invaluable work, KLF has learned a tremendous amount about working in a collaborative. KLF has taken the first step in this process by building a strong, trusting relationship between five organizations. Each organization has grown in their mentoring and match components; however, they look forward to increasing training opportunities, improving on collaborative recruitment approaches and continuing to find ways to streamline their work together.

With opioids ravaging East Tennessee, KAMI plans to empower mentee families, caretakers and mentors to help battle this epidemic. Poverty has increased in and around their communities, and KAMI has made a commitment to give their mentees hope and opportunity for their future.

Because of KAMI, mentors are better trained to deal with the issues their mentees face as they continue serving a growing number of children in the Knoxville area.


Related Resources

Published in Featured Grantees
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