Displaying items by tag: Relationship development

Tuesday, 18 November 2014 11:05

Tools for Mentoring Adolescents

 
  • Description of Resource:

    These Tools for Mentoring Adolescents were developed by the Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota, in collaboration with the Search Institute, to support and strengthen relationships between mentors and mentees. Ten downloadable tip sheets cover topics from “Developmental Characteristics of Younger and Older Adolescents” to “Setting Boundaries.” They can be used as part of a staff-led mentor training or as a supplemental resource to share with current or prospective mentors.

    The full list of topics:

    • TMA 1 - Mentoring Adolescents: Training Needs
    • TMA 2 - Making the Most of Mentoring an Adolescent
    • TMA 3 - Aren't Mentors for Little Kids
    • TMA 4 - Building Trust Attachment with Your Mentee
    • TMA 5 - Let's Get Real: Positive Communication
    • TMA 6 - Setting Mentoring Boundaries
    • TMA 7 - Influence of Culture on Mentoring Relationships
    • TMA 8 - Developmental Characteristics of 12-14 Year Olds
    • TMA 9 - Developmental Characteristics of 15-18 Year Olds
    • TMA 10 - Activity: What's Hot and What's Not

    Goals:

    These materials are intended to give mentors information about adolescent development and tips about specific mentoring approaches that can support youth over this age range. This resource is also designed to support training development.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    These materials emphasize the “ever-changing, but always interesting, adolescent years.”

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    Training
    Monitoring and Support

    Key Personnel:

    None.

    Additional Information:

    None.

  • Resource Name:

    Tools for Mentoring Adolescents

    Publisher/Source:

    Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota

    Author:

    Search Institute

    Date of Publication:

    2007

    Resource Type:

    Mentor Guides and Handouts








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    All 10 tools are available for download in PDF format on the Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota website at:
    http://www.mpmn.org/ToolsforMentoringAdolescents.aspx.












  • References:

    None

























Tools for Mentoring Adolescents

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Click here to download a PDF of this Resource.

 
  • Description of Resource:

    This manual, developed by the OJJDP National Mentoring Center, provides mentoring programs with a framework and sample materials to help them prepare, develop, and train mentees prior to matching them with mentors. It features information about the need for and goals of mentee training, as well as sample activities that can be used to create program-specific mentee training sessions. This resource also provides sample materials for a mentee handbook to accompany these training sessions.

    Goals:

    To equip mentoring program staff with information and tools to design effective mentee trainings.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    This resource provides guidance on developing mentee trainings for youth of a variety of ages. It is oriented toward a community-based program model but most activities and recommendations can be applied to a variety of program models.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    Training

    Key Personnel:

    N/A

    Additional Information:

    This project was supported by Award No. 1999-JG-FX-K001 awarded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. Points of view or opinions in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • Resource Name:

    Training New Mentees: A Manual for Preparing Youth in Mentoring Programs

    Publisher/Source:

    National Mentoring Center

    Author:

    Judy Strother Taylor and National Mentoring Center staff

    Date of Publication:

    2003

    Resource Type:

    Resources for Mentees and Families








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online in PDF form, at: http://educationnorthwest.org/sites/default/files/training-new-mentees.pdf

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























Training New Mentees: A Manual for Preparing Youth in Mentoring Programs

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Click here to download a PDF of this Resource.

 
  • Description of Resource:

    This resource outlines recommended practices for mentoring practitioners to support them in providing effective new mentor trainings. It reviews key steps to take in planning and implementing mentor trainings, as well as sample curricula, activities, handouts and an evaluation form. The training curricula provided focus on helping mentors build effective listening skills, using case examples and role plays to demonstrate these skills. They also cover recommendations for setting and maintaining boundaries with emphasis on positive youth development and collaborative mentoring.

    Goals:

    To guide mentoring practitioners in planning and implementing effective new mentor trainings.

    Target Population/Eligibility of Target Sites:

    This resource is oriented toward community-based mentoring programs, but contains curricula, activities and concepts that can be used in other mentoring settings.

    Corresponding Elements of Effective Practice:

    Training

    Key Personnel:

    N/A

    Additional Information:

    This resource was published by the Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence & the National Mentoring Center at Norwest Regional Educational Laboratory, with support from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, U.S. Department of Justice.

  • Resource Name:

    Training New Mentors: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities

    Publisher/Source:

    The Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence & the National Mentoring Center at Norwest Regional Educational Laboratory

    Author:

    Amy Cannata, Michael Garringer, Christian Rummell, Elsy Arevalo, and Linda Jucovy

    Date of Publication:

    2008

    Resource Type:

    Mentor Training Resources








  • Evaluation Methodology:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Outcomes:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness

    Evaluation Validity:

    Resource has not been evaluated for effectiveness












  • Accessing and Using this Resource:

    This resource can be accessed freely online in PDF form, at: http://educationnorthwest.org/sites/default/files/training.pdf

















  • References:

    Evidence Base: N/A

    Additional References: N/A



























Training New Mentors: Effective Strategies for Providing Quality Youth Mentoring in Schools and Communities

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Click here to download a PDF of this Resource.

JANUARY 18, 2016
BY: VIDA SANFORD, DISTRICT COORDINATOR, MENTORING FOR SUCCESS: PROJECT ARRIVE, SAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

Editor’s note: This week we are excited to be releasing the first in our series of publications exploring the research evidence on mentoring in certain program models or for certain populations. Dr. Gabe Kuperminc of our Research Board has authored a summary of what we know, and where we need more research, on group mentoring models. To supplement his evidence review, we’ve asked an experienced practitioner, Vida Sanford of Project Arrive/Mentoring for Success, to share her thoughts about what makes group mentoring effective and how practitioners can help their groups thrive.


I was recently at a meeting of mentoring program professionals where everyone in attendance was involved in running traditional one-to-one mentoring programs, except for me. During lunch, someone asked me about the program I work with. I explained that I manage a school-based group mentoring program in San Francisco called Mentoring For Success: Project Arrive, designed to support 9th grade students who had struggled academically and socially in middle school. The colleague replied "I tried to run a group once or twice. I couldn't get them to do anything. They wouldn't stay on topic, they did whatever they wanted, talked over each other and didn't listen to anything I said. I had no idea what I was in for."

I knew exactly what she meant. It's hard to run a good group! When San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD) received funding from OJJDP in 2010 to pilot a group mentoring program for students with truancy issues, we struggled to find viable research and resources to guide us on how to train and coach group mentors to lead effective groups. Nevertheless, we remained confident that a successful group mentoring experience could bring many unique benefits to students that SFUSD’s established one-to-one model could not.

Project Arrive forged ahead and we have learned a lot along the way, especially around the importance of group formation when developing a group mentoring program, one in which participants feel a sense of belonging, connection, and trust. Creating cohesive, connected and purposeful groups, especially for high-energy adolescents, doesn't happen without time and effort. Group mentors need to be trained on the same principles and practices that apply to 1:1 mentoring, but they also require additional awareness and understanding of the process of group formation and dynamics to better understand and address what is happening within their group at a given point in time.

In attempting to develop meaningful training content for our mentors, psychologist Bruce Tuckman's simple and memorable phrase "forming, storming, norming, and performing" is both useful and accessible to mentors, especially those who don't have a clinical or social work background. He described the 4-stage path that most teams follow on their way to high performance, and later added a fifth stage, "adjourning". We have found these to be highly applicable to the context of school-based group mentoring and offer some suggestions here about how mentors can support their groups in moving successfully through each stage.

Published in NMRC Blog
DECEMBER 10, 2015
BY: DEBORAH NEARY & WHITNEY MASTIN, MIDLANDS MENTORING PARTNERSHIP
Mentoring

At Midlands Mentoring Partnership (MMP), our community-wide data indicates that a priority must be made to reach the most vulnerable youth with quality formal mentoring services. A prospective solution came in 2013 when promising research was released that showed a tremendous potential for utilizing a new mentoring model called Youth Initiated Mentoring (YIM) to recruit positive adult role models to serve these youth. YIM empowers youth to identify and engage potential mentors within the constellation of caring adults already a part of their lives. The youth are then matched with their selected mentor in a formal mentoring model. The screening and training of the prospective mentor is supervised, facilitated, monitored, and supported by mentoring programs utilizing best practices. 

Published in NMRC Blog
Page 6 of 6

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